When Mrs. Carter, aka Beyonce, takes the stage this weekend in Atlantic City, audiences better pay their proper respect.

Otherwise, the pop diva, who performs Friday, July 26, at Boardwalk Hall, as part of her Mrs. Carter Show World Tour, is sure to set them straight.

During a performance earlier this month at Atlanta's Gwinnett Center, Beyonce admonished a fan who failed to put down his cell phone camera and take the mic during the opening of "Irreplaceable."

"See, you can't even sing because you're too busy taping," Beyonce said. "I'm right in your face baby, You gotta seize this moment baby. Put that damn camera down."

As one of the top current live acts, Beyonce is likely to provide plenty of reasons to watch her directly, instead of through a lens.

With no new album to promote, Beyonce, whose tour name refers to her husband, Jay-Z (Carter), is focusing on material from her 2011 album, "4," as well as her catalog of hits from her solo career and her days as the leader of the girl group Destiny's Child.

The setlist features such hits as "Run the World (Girls)," "Love on Top," "Single Ladies (Put a Ring on It)," "Baby Boy," "Crazy in Love" and "Survivor," as well as a cover of "I Will Always Love You," as one of the encores.

The proceedings include an 11-piece all-female band, the requisite troupe of dancers and a two-level stage, but they never overshadowed the main attraction, according to Chicago Tribune music critic Greg Kot.

Beyonce "delivered a show that demonstrated she's been keeping tabs on her pop peers," Kot writes of her July 17 performance at the United Center in Chicago. "She didn't so much surpass any of them as incorporate elements of each into her own choreographed spectacle - the blitz of costume changes by Katy Perry, the art-pop theatricality of Madonna and Lady Gaga, the Cirque du Soleil-style acrobatics of Pink."

While Beyonce takes great care with her appearance - she used stage fans to keep "her abundant hair blowing" and her face "remarkably free of perspiration," even during high-energy moments - she still isn't one to lip-sync.

"Despite the calisthenics, most of the singing appeared to be live rather than canned," Kot writes.

Kot's one major quibble was that Beyonce, unlike during the Atlanta show, largely stuck to the script.

"As it was, just about everything felt a little robotic, if totally professional," he writes. "Her voice is solid and flexible, but a bit thin around the edges, lacking the robustness that defines the greatest soul singers."

Unlike some divas past and present, Beyonce possesses an earthiness that no doubt endears her to the audience.

"For all her glamour, she projected accessibility, determination, a take-nothing-for-granted attitude," Kot writes. "'They listen to me when I talk, 'cause I ain't pretending,' she sang amid a confetti shower, fighting words for her and her thousands of female co-conspirators."

Fans who go to the Boardwalk Hall show, and bring a donation for Goodwill, will receive a scratch ticket to win Beyonce prizes.

The Goodwill-Beyonce engagement booth will be located on the Atlantic City Boardwalk at Kennedy Place from 3:30-8 p.m. Friday.