There aren't too many restaurants or bars where you can show up by boat, or places you can spend the night on a beach while listening to live music and sipping on a drink of choice from a full bar.

That's some of what makes The Deauville Inn on the bay between Sea Isle City and Ocean City, "unlike any place else in the area" owner Lynda Brown says.

"We provide the beach chairs and umbrellas, you provide the sunblock," Brown says.

The Deauville Inn offers patrons four distinctive experiences: an indoor dining room, a sports bar, an outdoor deck and The Beach House, the latter two right on the bay.

Patrons can - and often do - show up via the water, but by car works, too.

Its dining room offers a full lunch and dinner menu prepared by Chef Dan Lynch and a full bar featuring six beers on tap. The Tuckahoe Company, a nanobrewery in Dennis Township, is currently on tap.

The sports bar offers a more relaxed environment to watch a game or enjoy a casual meal, with a second full bar, more tables and 11 flat-screen HDTVs with DirecTV. Then there's the outside deck overlooking the bay, and The Beach House in the sand where you can sit with a Deauville Sunset in hand (a variation of an Amaretto sour) and enjoy some live music.

Local bands that regularly play at The Deauville Inn include Bubba Mac Band, Tidal Wave and Thirsty Wilson.


Lynda's father, Walter Carpenter, used to tend bar at the Deauville Inn back in the '50s and '60s, and the owners at that time, Charlie and Madeline Weiss, took a liking to him.

After Charlie Weiss died, Madeline decided to sell.

"She told a friend 'If my Walter still wants to buy the Deauville, tell him to get in touch with me,'" Brown says.

So he did. In 1980, Walter Carpenter, who has since passed, purchased The Deauville Inn. The building itself dates back to the late 1800s. Despite many people telling Walter to demolish the old building and start from scratch, he refused, Brown says.

Over the years, The Deauville Inn has undergone many renovations and upgrades but has been sympathetic to its original structure.

"People drive past it and say it looks the same. They can't believe what's been done inside," she says.