2400. That's the highest score that you can receive with all the sections combined on the SAT reasoning test - a dream for me and many others to achieve.

The current SAT Reasoning Test, introduced in 2005, takes three hours and forty-five minutes to finish and costs $47, excluding late fees. They say it's a way to measure a student's capability for colleges, and most require their students to take it before applying for college.

The College Board states that the SAT measures literacy and writing skills that are needed for academic success in college. They state that the SAT assesses how well the test takers analyze and solve problems—skills they learned in school that they will need in college.

Usually, most high school juniors and seniors take them. My 12-year-old cousin, who is very gifted, took the test this year and got a higher score than me.

Guess that says something about me.

The SAT is more popular on the coasts, while its closest competitor, the ACT, is popular in the South and Midwest. The SAT consists of three sections: Critical Reading, Mathematics, and Writing (although most schools only care about first two).

There is also a PSAT, a practice SAT you can take for $20 which they say helps you get familiar with the real SAT ... I thought it was very unhelpful. Many, many businesses are run around SAT prep and can be very pricey.

Disclaimer: I didn't fare so well with the SATs after taking them twice. Personally, I think the SAT is the dumbest way to measure anyone's abilities. The SATs are way more than I've ever learned in school and I don't think a standardized test is ever a good option to check ones' skills.

I suffer from a bit of ADHD, and sitting in a hot room on a highly uncomfortable desk, trying the best to focus on an very important test is close to impossible for me. There is no special arrangements for those like me. I think that shows why I don't fare so well with standardized tests and perform much much better on normal school work.

Colleges don't see that I suffer from ADHD, they they see my score. I don't think colleges should base who they accept solely on someone's SAT scores - which many do - but rather on their achievements and experience in what they hope to purse as a major. Colleges should realize that a student should not be defined by their results on one (what I think) ridiculously stupid test.

But since they do, I'm going to take the ACTs and see if I fare better. Luckily, the colleges that I'm applying to - Walter Cronkite School of Journalism at Arizona State University, University of Missouri's Journalism School, and University of Miami - all accept both the ACTs and SATs.

Apparently, the state lawmakers in Idaho disagree with me. Since they believe it's so important to the take the SAT, they're saving their students $47 in hopes more with take the test. All Idaho high school juniors can now take the SAT for free, state Superintendent of Schools Tom Luna announced recently.

“Our goal is for every Idaho child to be college- and career-ready,” Luna said. “For the first time, every Idaho student will have the opportunity to take a college entrance exam, paid for by the state, and to know whether they are prepared for the rigors of postsecondary education.”

And that's where he goes wrong. After taking it twice, I don't see how that test shows your capabilities pre-college, pre-career and definitely not how ready one is for postsecondary education.

The College Board, the company that produces the SAT is in business to make money and thanks to their great business techniques, they're thriving. I hear the ACT is much more logical and is a better way to check one's skills, so I will give it a try. I encourage someone in charge at one of the colleges and universities to take it, and see for themselves. Someone needs to step up to the plate, and get hit with a dose of reality.