Nothing against the New Jersey Devils, Boston Bruins or Montreal Canadiens, but the Philadelphia Flyers had as good a draw as they possibly could have hoped for in the first three rounds of the NHL playoffs.

As the No. 7 seed, they drew a second-seeded New Jersey team which they had owned in the regular season. Thanks to upsets by the Bruins and Canadiens, Philadelphia avoided the other top teams - No. 1 Washington, No. 3 Buffalo and No. 4 Pittsburgh.

But if the Flyers can close out Montreal - they lead the best-of-seven Eastern Conference finals 3-1 - they'll face their toughest challenge yet.

Chicago, the No. 2 seed in the Western Conference, completed a four-game sweep of No. 1 San Jose on Sunday to reach the Stanley Cup finals.

The Blackhawks are a complete team.

Their goaltender, Antti Niemi, has been one of the best in the playoffs. His .921 save percentage is second to Montreal's Jaroslav Halak among goalies who have played in more than seven playoff games (the Flyers' Michael Leighton is No. 1 at .951, but he has played in less than half of their games). Niemi has stymied the Sharks and Canucks, two strong offensive teams, in the past two rounds.

Chicago has a dynamic offense led by Patrick Kane, Jonathan Toews, Marion Hossa and former Flyer Patrick Sharp. Toews (26 points) and Kane (20) are the top two playoff scorers in the league.

And the Blackhawks have a strong defense anchored by Brian Campbell and Canadian Olympians Brent Seabrook and Duncan Keith.

The Flyers obviously have looked great so far, but this would be the first series in which they enter as heavy underdogs.

That's not to say Philadelphia can't win it all. But there would be no margin for error. The Flyers are not going to beat Chicago playing as they did in the first two games against Montreal, and they certainly are not going to come back from a 3-0 series deficit against the Blackhawks.