After the earthquake in Haiti earlier this year, Michael Cagno, executive director of The Noyes Museum of Art of The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, knew he wanted to do something for citizens of the ravaged country.

Noticing a strong Haitian community in Atlantic County, Cagno realized local galleries were not celebrating Haitian art. So the Vineland resident suggested that representatives of the Noyes reach out to the country’s residents culturally.

Cagno, along with Linwood’s Dorrie Papademetriou, a director at the Noyes; Hammonton’s Celeste Safeer, a Stockton student; and Florcy Morrisset, who owns a Haitian art gallery in Philadelphia, brought Project HEART (Haiti Emergency Art Relief Team) to Haiti.

The quartet worked at children’s camps for seven days, giving students the opportunity to explore new art materials and to express themselves through a variety of mediums. In January, in commemoration of the earthquake’s one-year anniversary, the Noyes will sponsor various exhibits: artwork made by the children will be on display at the Noyes’ Artport at the Atlantic City International Airport; professional artwork purchased in Haiti will be featured at the Noyes in Oceanville; and photography from the trip will be on display in Hammonton.

“When you look at U.S. tragedies such as Katrina and 9/11, art was there for people to help cope … to make sure life goes on,” Cagno said.

Woman happy to be ‘bra lady’

Marla Wink is not just happy to be known on Long Beach Island as the “bra lady,” she makes a living from it.

The 52-year-old, who lives in the Holgate section of Long Beach Township, owns Indian Summer, a women’s boutique in Beach Haven’s Bay Village shopping center.

Wink, who has owned the business for 23 years, said she always did pretty well, but taking advantage of an Oprah Winfrey episode about five years ago — in which Winfrey informed women they were probably wearing the wrong size bras — transformed Wink into the bra lady.

Advertising that she not only fitted women for bras, but that she also had bras for well-endowed women — including the one Oprah touted — in stock, Wink’s business changed overnight, and she has now measured more chests than she ever thought she would.

Her store features thousands of bras, and Wink said she has at least 20 bras per size — from 28A to 48JJ — to offer her finicky customers.

“Oprah was right,” said Wink, whose store also offers fitted bathing suits and other women’s apparel. “I would say that 85 percent of women are wearing the wrong size bra, and they are way off when it comes to their size, too. They call me the ‘bra lady,’ and I am fine with it. It’s actually pretty funny.”


Staff Writer Donna Weaver contributed to this report.


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