By any measuring stick, Anthony Trebino had a remarkable life. As a young man, he was a thoroughbred racehorse jockey. When he quit racing he went to medical school and became an anesthesiologist at AtlantiCare Regional Medical Center. In his spare time, he was an accomplished pianist, woodworker and gourmet cook.

Sadly, Anthony's life was cut short in January 2012 when, at the age of 56, he succumbed to a brain tumor. But the house he bought for his loving wife, Carla, still stands in the quaint pinelands town of Port Republic.

Anthony and Carla first met in 1980 at Keystone Racetrack in Philadelphia, where he was a jockey and she was a groom. Their paths didn't cross again until more than 20 years later, when Carla was a nurse and Anthony was a physician with AtlantiCare.

"We were both divorced at the time and we just reconnected," Carla recalls. "I knew he was terminally ill when I married him but I knew however many years we had together were going to be the best years of my life."

The stately colonial the couple purchased in Port Republic was nearing completion when Anthony and Carla stumbled upon it in 2003.

"Ted Weber was building it as a spec house," Carla says. "Tony and I were driving by one day looking at houses and we fell in love with it."

The five-bedroom, 3 ½ bath house has three stories and about 3,600 square feet of living space.

"Tony wanted a five-bedroom house," Carla says. "I have three children from my first marriage and Tony has a daughter and we had all four of them staying here at one time or another."

The house stands on a partially wooded one-acre lot in the heart of Port Republic, a picturesque village carved out of Galloway Township in 1905. There are only about 1,100 residents in the 8.5-square-mile town, which is bordered on the north by the Mullica River and on the east by Nacote Creek and Mill Pond.

A stone driveway wraps around the front of the cedar sided house, which is entered from a covered front porch with a slate floor. A three-story foyer has a ceramic tile floor and a formal staircase that wraps around to the third floor.

The center hall design features a formal dining room and a living room on either side of the foyer. There are two wood-burning fireplaces, one in the family room, which is set into a floor-to-ceiling brick chimney, and another in the second-floor master suite.

The kitchen has a walk-in pantry and a large island with a five-burner propane range and granite counters. A covered back porch with a mahogany floor runs the length of the house. A large backyard shed that Tony built is currently home to Carla's restored 1967 Volkswagen Beetle.

The first floor also has a powder room and a small office off the family room. Three bedrooms, one with a private bath, a master suite and a laundry room are located on the second floor. The master features hardwood floors and a magnificent sitting room with a corner fireplace and a brick chimney that extends to the top of a vaulted ceiling. There are two walk-in closets and another cathedral ceiling in the bedroom. The master bath has an oversized Jacuzzi tub, a bidet and a large tiled walk-in shower chamber.

The third floor has a bedroom and a large unfinished storage are. The house has three zones of geothermal heat and central air conditioning. There's also a full unfinished basement and an oversized attached two-car garage that is entered from the side.

A year after Tony's passing, Carla is finally ready to sell the house and move on.

"It's a beautiful home and I'll miss it, but it's a lot for me to maintain," says Carla, who currently works as a pediatric nurse with AtlantiCare. "I'll probably rent a place for a while and then I'll see."

An open house at this property, which is located at 134 Mill Street, will be held Saturday, March 23, from noon to 2 p.m. For more information and directions call Paula Morss of Prudential Fox & Roach Realtors, 609-703-3736.

Contact David Enscoe: