ATLANTIC CITY - When it came to deciding what pictures she wanted to shoot of the giant Monopoly game board on the Atlantic City Boardwalk, Andrea Hinds said she wanted a little bit of everything.

"Sometimes coming down here is all about the picture," Hinds, of Staten Island, N.Y., said Friday.

Hinds was among those who captured a memory Friday afternoon by posing with the large game pieces in front of Bally's Atlantic City.

The pieces are part of a promotional campaign with the casino. The "Pass GO! Collect $200" Monopoly promotion began Sept. 1 and ends Dec. 2.

Don Marrandino, president of the Bally's, Caesars, Harrah's Resort, and Showboat casinos owned by Caesars Entertainment Corp., said the concept of bringing Hasbro's Monopoly to Atlantic City seemed natural.

After all, the game was inspired by the city.

Monopoly was created by Charles Darrow, of Germantown, Pa., in 1933, Hasbro's website says.

Darrow created the game when he was unemployed during the Great Depression. Executives at Parker Brothers rejected the idea in 1934, but a year later began mass production of the game, based on acquiring and collecting rent on properties named after Atlantic City streets.

"I think the history of Atlantic City needs to be celebrated," Marrandino said Friday, adding Monopoly has not been used as a promotional tool for area casinos before.

Despite signage on the structure advising against climbing on the game pieces and the board, Marrandino recognized tourists would likely descend to the area to take pictures and interact with the game pieces.

Marrandino said the game once was a big part of pop culture.

"Go back 15 years or greater and I don't think there were many people that didn't know Monopoly," he said.

A trip down memory lane was exactly what happened for those who stopped to admire the silver car or hotel pieces on the prime squares of the board.

"As a child, I played Monopoly all summer when I was in fifth grade," said Cheryl Murphy, of Egg Harbor Township. "This is incredible."

Murphy called the newest addition to the Boardwalk a welcome tourist attraction that could entice visitors to stay in the city longer and see what else they can stumble upon.

"It draws people in. People want to see what it is," she said.

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