The election of 2012 provided this nation with one of the closest contests in many years.

Although the Electoral College provided President Barack Obama with a solid margin of victory, the popular vote showed how close the election truly was as far as the people were concerned. We now hear the political pundits explaining why it happened the way it did.

Those of us in the general population have our own particular thoughts and just pray that the two parties will work together in Congress to get the necessary bills completed to get this country moving on the right track. It was interesting to note that more women were elected, and hopefully we will find more will enter the political realm and seek political office for various portions of our government.

Locally, we saw for the very first time in more than 100 years that Brigantine has a Democrat majority on City Council. One may attribute this to the fact that the Republicans were scrambling among themselves and were not united behind those who ran for office.

I also find it interesting to see that Democrat Colin Bell was able to win this year running for an at-large Atlantic County freeholder seat. That was shocking to many in the Republican Party.

It seems as though times are changing and people no longer are voting strict party lines. Many of them are picking one from column A and one from column B, and do not seem to be concerned about the party of those running for the varied offices. I believe this is good as it will make the legislators work together to provide the legislation needed to make our lives better.

The change of the date for school board elections had more people running for office and more people voting for those who desired to become members of their respective boards. This is good news, as too many times the number of people who voted for school board members was between 10 percent and 20 percent. Unfortunately, there are still municipalities that have their school board elections in April. They will continue to have low turnouts and fewer people running for their boards.

Without a doubt, this election had more people voting than in previous presidential elections. Hopefully, the people will continue to stay involved and let their elected officials know what they want. One way to do that is to get involved in your local community’s radio talk shows. It has been shown that the politicos have their staffs listening to what the public is saying on the shows and several of them tape the programs.

Please keep involved.

WOND on 102.7 FM

Unfortunately, Sandy decided to literally sink WOND 1400 AM’s transmitter. It was under a minimum of 4 feet of salty water during the height of the storm. The insurance company is talking about “totaling” out this broadcast facility, as in its opinion nothing can be salvaged. Some of you may remember its shack on Old Turnpike Road in Pleasantville, the site of the Pleasantville toll plaza. That is where I first became associated with Howard Green, the owner of WOND at that time. This is by far the worst flooding ever at that site.

For the time being, all shows on WOND 1400 AM have been moved to its sister station, 102.7 FM. This will continue until Longport Media is able to replace the transmitters, electrical service at the site and about 190 feet of boardwalk used to access the site. I am happy to inform you that an order for a replacement transmitter was placed last week. Join your favorite talk show hosts and share opinions of what is taking place not only nationally but, more important for most of us, locally.

What’s next?

We went through Irene, the derecho storm, Sandy and now another northeaster Wednesday.

All have come in a relatively short period of time. As noted last week, Sandy was crowned as the 100-Year Storm that caused the most damage.

So, what’s next?

There are prognosticators who are saying that this is going to be the way it will be in the years to come. There are those who say that the ocean is creeping more inland and will eventually wipe out islands like ours. I’m not one who believes that to be true, but I’m speaking from my heart and not my head. I have not studied the action of the waves and the ocean. One thing we’ve learned, I hope, is that wider beaches, such as those in Wildwood, protect the inland. Maybe we should widen our beaches.

The dunes?

I know many of you are wondering what I am going to say about the dunes being lowered. Tony Rodio, president of Tropicana, publicly stated that if the dunes in Atlantic City had been 2 feet lower, the water would have reached his property and caused serious damage. He looked at me when he made that statement, and I told him I based my information on experts on beach actions.

It was pointed out that Long Beach Island had dunes that were as much as 22 feet high and failed to protect the homes behind them. I still believe that the dunes should be wider. If we are going to have them as high as they have been, make them wider with boards on top so that people may walk along and see the ocean and beach. Will that happen? I doubt it, but it’s worthy of consideration.

People helping people

Over the years, the one thing we have learned is that when there is a catastrophe, such as Sandy, those who have lost possessions and are in dire need of assistance receive that assistance from not only their neighbors who suffered little if any damage, but also from people who come from great distances to help those in need.

That is the American way of life. When other nations have had earthquakes and major storms, such as we just suffered, the United States is among the first to respond. Many people have questioned, “Have we received offers of assistance from other nations?” Not to my knowledge. Thankfully, we don’t need them, as we take care of our own. But it would be nice to know that they are as concerned about our welfare as we have been for them.

Pinky's Corner appears every Thursday in The Press. The Pinky’s Corner radio show airs 4 to 6 p.m. Mondays through Fridays on WOND 1400-AM. His TV show, "WMGM Presents Pinky," airs 7:30 p.m. Saturdays on NBC TV40. Email Pinky at: pinky@pressofac.com.