Atlantic City’s proposed 2013-14 school budget, combined with a planned increase in municipal taxes, could increase the typical resort homeowner’s tax bill by more than $1,000.

If the school budget is approved by the school board, the owner of a home valued at the average residential assessment of $229,000 would pay about $2,123 in school taxes next year, a $427 increase.

A rate increase under the preliminary city municipal budget would add an additional $618 to that property owner's tax bill.

The combined bill for school and municipal taxes would be about $5,300. That total does not include county and other taxes.

The proposed school budget requires slightly less money from local property owners, but the amount of school tax an average homeowner pays could still increase by as much as 25 percent because of a loss of ratables in the city, primarily due to casino tax appeals.

School Superintendent Donna Haye said district officials worked to keep spending flat while still dealing with increased costs.

“The problem is the city lost ratables,” she said. “So there will be a tax impact.”

The value of taxable property in Atlantic City has dropped from $18.1 billion to $14.4 billion. That loss would drive the school tax rate from the current $7.41 to $9.27 per $1,000 of assessed value even without additional spending by the school district.

In the school plan, the total general fund budget is proposed at $162.5 million, which reflects a $2.26 million increase in state aid.

The local property tax levy is dropping about $650,000, from $134.2 million this year to $133.5 million for 2013-14. The levy includes $118.1 million toward the general fund budget and $15.3 million in debt service.

The total proposed budget, including special revenue and debt service is $187.6 million.

Haye said enrollment has been increasing, and that must be addressed next year. The district is also anticipating the return of as many as 280 additional students next year after the Oceanside Charter School in the city closes in June.

The district will get to keep the $4 million in tuition that had been sent to Oceanside but is planning to re-open the old Brighton Avenue School to relieve overcrowding. Haye said the funds are needed to buy textbooks and supplies and hire staff for that school. The school was used by students from the old Richmond Avenue School until their new school opened this year.

School officials will make a formal presentation of the proposed budget at a public hearing at 6 p.m. Monday at the school board office, 1300 Atlantic Ave. The school board is also scheduled to vote on the proposed budget.

Contact Diane D’Amico:

609-272-7241

Atlantic City’s proposed 2013-14 school budget, combined with a planned increase in municipal taxes, could increase the typical resort homeowner’s tax bill by more than $1,000.

If the school budget is approved by the school board, the owner of a home valued at the average residential assessment of $229,000 would pay about $2,123 in school taxes next year, a $427 increase.

A rate increase under the preliminary city municipal budget would add an additional $618 to that property owner's tax bill.

The combined bill for school and municipal taxes would be about $5,300. That total does not include county and other taxes.

The proposed school budget requires slightly less money from local property owners, but the amount an average homeowner pays could still increase by as much as 25 percent because of a loss of ratables in the city, primarily due to casino tax appeals.

School Superintendent Donna Haye said district officials worked to keep spending flat while still dealing with increased costs.

“The problem is the city lost ratables,” she said. “So there will be a tax impact.”

The value of taxable property in Atlantic City has dropped from $18.1 billion to $14.4 billion. That loss would drive the school tax rate from the current $7.41 to $9.27 per $1,000 of assessed value even without additional spending by the school district.

In the school plan, the total general fund budget is proposed at $162.5 million, which reflects a $2.26 million increase in state aid.

The local property tax levy is dropping about $650,000, from $134.2 million this year to $133.5 million for 2013-14. The levy includes $118.1 million toward the general fund budget and $15.3 million in debt service.

The total proposed budget, including special revenue and debt service is $187.6 million.

Haye said enrollment has been increasing, and that must be addressed next year. The district is also anticipating the return of as many as 280 additional students next year after the Oceanside Charter School in the city closes in June.

The district will get to keep the $4 million in tuition that had been sent to Oceanside but is planning to re-open the old Avenue School to relieve overcrowding. Haye said the funds are needed to buy textbooks and supplies and hire staff for that school. The school was used by students from the old Richmond Avenue School until their new school opened this year.

School officials will make a formal presentation of the proposed budget at a public hearing at 6 p.m. Monday at the school board office, 1300 Atlantic Ave. The school board is also scheduled to vote on the proposed budget.

Contact Diane D’Amico:

609-272-7241