Question: The gold pin shown in my photo was given to my grandmother many years ago. It is 2 1/4 inches long, 1 inch high and stamped with a script "Weiss." Please tell me about the pin's maker, age, worth and if it is collectible jewelry. - D.W., Ventnor

Answer: Your pin was produced by Albert Weiss & Co. Inc. during the late 1950s and early 1960s. Founded in 1942 by jewelry designer and manufacturer, Albert Weiss, the New York City firm created exceptional costume jewelry until it closed in 1971.

The cuffed, brushed-gold hand, decorated with a hand-wired quartet of shimmering aurora borealis crystals and tiny rhinestones, is one of a large group of detailed Weiss figurals that includes ja-panned metal butterflies and strawberries studded with high-quality faux gemstones. Because jewelry hallmarked by Weiss & Co. was made for less than 30 years, the somewhat scarce, sought-after pieces are treasured by today's costume jewelry collectors who pay $65 to $85 for a pin such as yours.

Popularity and scarcity of Weiss jewelry has resulted in an explosion of fake Weiss items. Made in China and Canada, they are sold at antiques and collectibles shops and shows, flea markets and online.

As a result, Weiss experts suggest buyers carefully in-spect the hallmark on any jewelry offered as genuine Weiss and ask a seller to guarantee in writing the authenticity of such a piece.

Alyce Hand Benham is an antiques broker, appraiser and estate-liquidation specialist whose consulting firm, Treasures Unlimited, is based in southern New Jersey. Send questions to: Alyce Benham, Life section, The Press of Atlantic City, 11 Devins Lane, Pleasantville, NJ 08232. Letters may be used in future columns but cannot be answered individually, and photos cannot be returned.

Question: I purchased a Heisey glass, sugar shaker decorated with four pineapples and scalloped edges. It has a paper label. I would like information about it, including age and value. - S.R., Ocean City

Answer: Augustus H. Heisey founded the A.H. Heisey & Co. glass factory at Newark, Ohio, in 1896. The firm made fine pressed and blown glassware until 1957. Heisey's early pressed pattern-glass tableware that imitated cut glass was replaced by etched mold-blown barware and stemware during the 1920s and 1930s. In 1940, the company's most successful blown pattern, "Orchid," debuted and "Plantation," a popular pressed pattern was introduced soon after.

When Heisey closed, its molds and "H-in-a-diamond" trademark - impressed on wares or printed on labels since 1900 - were sold to the Imperial Glass Corp. and used by Imperial until 1971. Following Imperial's 1971 bankruptcy, the Heisey Collectors of America organization acquired the trademark.

Without photographs of your shaker and its label, I cannot provide certain identification and evaluation. However, your description suggests it might be an early Florida Pineapple pattern object, a limited-edition item issued by the HCA or vintage Plantation ware. Similar Plantation pieces, impressed with the diamond H, presently sell for $45 to $60.

Alyce Hand Benham is an antiques broker, appraiser and estate-liquidation specialist whose consulting firm, Treasures Unlimited, is based in southern New Jersey. Send questions to: Alyce Benham, Life section, The Press of Atlantic City, 11 Devins Lane, Pleasantville, NJ 08232. Letters may be used in future columns but cannot be answered individually, and photos cannot be returned.