Like many Jewish holidays, Rosh Hashana - the Jewish new year - is rich with delicious, symbolic foods. Rounds of challah bread, for example, signify continuity, while apples and honey represent wishes for a sweet year to come. Of course, just as important is spending time with loved ones.

Latest Video

So we created a dish to satisfy both the traditional food customs and the desire to spend time with family. Baked stuffed apples have both the honey and the apples for the sweetness, yet take little effort to make.

The method is so simple, even the children can help. Adults can core the apples while the kids make the filling and stuff them. Let them get their hands dirty by breaking the walnuts, chopping the dates (if they're old enough), and mixing the filling by kneading it together in a bowl. The result is a sweet and satisfying dessert that isn't laden with butter.

Taking cues from the Mediterranean, we flavored the filling with orange and mint. It makes for a great contrast to the otherwise sweet blend of honey and dates. If you don't have (or don't like) dates, other dried fruit will work just as well. Try dried chopped apricots or raisins. The same goes for the walnuts. Substitute another variety of nut or leave them out altogether.

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.