SEATTLE - Nancy and Ann Wilson are two of Seattle's most famous names. Making up the rock band Heart, they've sold more than 35 million albums worldwide.

Last March, the sisters - now 56 and 60, respectively - filmed an upcoming DVD, "Heart: Night at Sky Church" in Seattle. The March concert was an intimate glimpse of the popular '70s rock group, which played new songs from the album "Red Velvet Car" (due out Tuesday) and old hits such as "Crazy on You." Alison Krauss joined in as guest artist on the mike and fiddle.

Nancy Wilson spoke recently by phone from Albuquerque about the DVD and the rock scene today.

Question: What was it like playing to a hometown crowd?

Answer: It's always really fun to play in Seattle. We love our own hometown so much. ... Ann is living in Seattle all the time and I still have a place in Seattle. I have to spend a lot of time in L.A., but I always get to Seattle whenever I can.

Q: Why did it take six years for this new album?

A: We've been pretty busy being moms. ... Ann did a solo album since "Jupiters Darling," called "Hope & Glory." ... Plus, we did a children's book for the anniversary of "Dog & Butterfly" and another version of "Dog & Butterfly" for Amazon.

Q: What is the new album like?

A: It's very hard-rock acoustic - that's something Heart does that you don't really find elsewhere very much. ... It's not a digitally constructed sound at all, or a layered sound. It's a very on-the-spot, human conversational sound.

Q: Over the years, have you seen more women enter the business?

A: There are more women that are successful in pop culture, but as far as rock 'n' roll is concerned, I don't really see any. ... When you see Lady Gaga, it's unbelievable to see what she's done with her image. I know she's quite talented, too, but it's the image that makes you notice, more than what she sounds like. It's like, wow, is that what it takes anymore?

Q: How do you and Ann get along?

A: Our relationship is really strong. We tour together through the summer. We work on songs together. ... The kids come out with us on the tour. We're really a family business.

Q: How do you two stay friends?

A: We are rare that way. We're a military family ... being shuttled around from base to base. We still feel like we have our little fighting unit out here, but instead of guns, we have guitars ... spreading the good word with our music, town to town.