Jorge Ceballos recently took advantage of The Big Fix.

He had his 5 year old female pit bull Alazay microchipped and spayed with the help of the spay-neuter assistance project of the Central Valley Coalition for Animals. The chip will bring him peace of mind, he said.

"If she gets lost it will be easier and quicker to get her back," said Ceballos.

The Big Fix is partnering with local shleters to help bring dogs home in a safe and efficient manner. Angela Vera, area coordinator for The Big Fix, says Forever Home kicks off this month.

"The magic that microchipping does is fantastic," Vera said.

The microchips usually cost $51.99 to $70, Vera says. HomeAgain and Res-Q both provide microchips. The former product includes a yearly fee, while the latter does not.

The Big Fix uses Res-Q - made by Bayer - because its multifaceted system uses PetLink. Owners have a 24-hour hotline and tools to search a database to see if their pet has been located.

According to Vera, microchips are about the size of a grain of rice and are encased in a protective covering so they don't disintegrate. They are inserted into the dog's shoulder area.

The chips are assigned an identification number which are then read through a scanner. The scanner is ISO compatible and can read any frequency of microchips.

This tracking method saves the owner time, as he/she doesn't have to visit the shelter and look for their pet. Rather they can log onto the site or call the number.

According to Augie Gonzalez, the Animal Control Unit Supervisor for the Porterville Animal Shelter, the microchip is now being fully used at the shelter.

"As of January 1, 2012 every dog that has been adopted out of the Porterville shelter has gotten microchipped," said Gonzalez. "It is a tool for us to get animals back to their owners, and it eliminates animals coming into the shelters."