Bridging controversy

DETROIT - Supporters and opponents of a new international bridge linking Detroit and Windsor, Ontario, have until Aug. 9 to submit written comments. The U.S. State Department will accept the comments by email. Residents also can view the application for the presidential permit needed to build the bridge on the federal agency's web site. Comment by email at The permit application can be viewed at

There's a map for that

WASHINGTON - The world's largest museum complex is being mapped room by room through a partnership with Google. Beginning Tuesday, visitors at the Smithsonian Institution can use a smartphone to find their way through 17 museums, the National Zoo in Washington and locations in northern Virginia and New York City. The interior maps include maps of the National Air and Space Museum, National Museum of American History and National Museum of Natural History, which draw millions of visitors. Maps also have been completed for the National Portrait Gallery and a half dozen other art museums.

UA settles suit

BOSTON - United Airlines has settled a lawsuit alleging companies it contracted to provide skycaps at airports around the country paid them less than minimum wage while not allowing them to keep all of their tips. A federal judge approved a final settlement of $250,000, meaning 135 skycaps will receive about $1,000 each, after attorneys' fees. The amount given to each skycap will be proportionate to his or her damages from October 2006 to August 2008, when Chicago-based United imposed a $2 fee for each bag checked curbside. The skycaps were required to give the $2 fee to the airlines or subcontractors. Their lawyers alleged because some customers failed to pay the fee the skycaps sometimes had to use their tip money to pay it.

A Pueblo perspective

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. - A new exhibit at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center in Albuquerque explores the unique history of New Mexico's pueblos in relation to the U.S. government. The pueblos never signed treaties and didn't fit the government's mold of native people. Still, they were subjected to policies that called for them to stop speaking their native languages and send their children to boarding school. The exhibit tells the story from the perspective of the pueblos of the effects of 100 years of state and federal policy on their communities and culture. It includes photographs, letters, pottery and other crafts, documents, quotes, and touchscreens and links to videos and interviews.

Scopes canceled

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. - There won't be a Scopes Festival in Dayton this year. For more than 20 years, the town has held a festival in July marking the anniversary of the famous Scopes "monkey trial" that took place in Dayton in 1925. A new play about the trial over the teaching the theory of Evolution in school was to debut at the festival, but organizers said they ran into problems with the production, such as scheduling conflicts among cast members.