News

Home

No traces of Sandy remain in picture-perfect Cape May

Micki McGlade's locally famous, eponymous restaurant on a pier by the beach was one of Cape May's few businesses damaged by Hurricane Sandy.

"Maybe McGlade's took the biggest hit, given our location," she said. "For the most part, all of Cape May has to be extremely happy."

McGlade, of West Cape May, said she and others shoveled out sand for weeks, but they took advantage of the opportunity by restoring the interior.

"We did, what you call, unplanned renovations," she said. "We freshened the place up a little bit."

Those types of changes will likely be the only evidence summer visitors to Cape May will find that a historic force of nature passed by this seaside resort in the off-season.

"The people that visit Cape May won't even have a memory of Sandy once they cross the bridge into Cape May," said John Cooke, manager of the Victorian Motel and president of the Greater Cape May Chamber of Commerce.

Cooke said some residences were flooded or had roofs damaged by falling trees, but he estimated 100 percent of businesses that planned to reopen by Memorial Day will do so.

"We were ready to receive guests almost immediately after the storm," he said.

McGlade said she did not have a drop of water in her home and never lost power throughout Sandy. While her business was damaged, it is closed during the off-season anyway, and it is reopening on Mother's Day weekend as it always does.

"I personally feel I don't have a right to complain because so many lost so much, because they lost their homes," she said. "That's incomprehensible to me. Cape May was very fortunate. Very little damage was done."

Video

 

Comments