PARAMUS — New Jersey has not seen a rise in crashes caused by vehicle malfunctions since it stopped motor vehicle safety inspections in 2010.

An analysis by The Record (http://bit.ly/S0XSsw ) newspaper found vehicle malfunctions accounted for roughly 2 percent of all yearly accidents. That's the same percentage that occurred in the two years prior to the change.

Acting state Highway Traffic Safety director Gary Poedubicky tells the newspaper the primary responsibility for performing safety checks remains with each car owner and driver.

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The Christie administration stopped safety checks and focused just on emissions in order to save about $12 million a year.

Police can ticket drivers for tinted windows, license-plate infractions and bald tires.

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Information from: The Record (Woodland Park, N.J.), http://www.northjersey.com

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Local news editor at the Press of Atlantic City. SUNY Geneseo and Syracuse University grad. New Jersey transplant.

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