A weekly update of stories previously reported

On Feb. 6, 2012, Mullica Township residents heard news they rarely encounter in their quiet rural town.

John Kingsbury, 77, was found dead in his home after being shot twice the day before. It was the first murder in the township since 1999.

But a year after the incident no arrests have been made. The Atlantic County Prosecutor’s Office is handling the investigation. Spokeswoman Haleigh Walz said the investigation is ongoing. The office does not comment on active investigations.

Mullica Mayor James Brown said the case has not been forgotten among local residents.

“I still get questions about it,” he said. “It was unbelievable that it could happen in a town like this. We’re a quiet town and we don’t have a lot of problems. To see something like this happen was a shock.”

On Aug. 4 the Beth El Synagogue was full of local residents, officials, Swedish dignitaries and clergy of all different faiths to honor a man who saved thousands of lives during the Holocaust.

And this year they will create a permanent memorial to his legacy.

The congregation on Jerome Avenue in Margate honored Raoul Wallenberg, a Swedish diplomat who, while stationed in Budapest, Hungary, during World War II, issued thousands of passports so Jews could escape the concentration camps and enter Sweden, which was neutral during the war.

Rabbi Aaron Krauss said he wanted to have a ceremony last August for Wallenberg on what would have been his 100th birthday to showcase someone who preserved “the reputation of humanity.”

Wallenberg reportedly died in Lubyanka Prison in Moscow in 1947, though his family has been investigating the possibility that he may have lived for decades longer.

After the event Krauss said many involved wanted to do something more to honor Wallenberg and they had the idea to name a street after him. Krauss said he has recently received permission from Atlantic County Executive Dennis Levinson to put a sign for “Raoul Wallenberg Plaza” on Jerome and Fulton avenues in front of the synagogue.

Levinson said it’s a special honor for the “recognition of an international hero that’s long overdue.”

A formal ceremony is being planned for the summer, Krauss said.

“Raoul Wallenberg was a man who redeemed humanity at a time when things were terrible,” Krauss said. “We feel when people pass by and see the name Raoul Wallenberg they will know of a man of that nature.”

When Hurricane Sandy struck at the end of October it wasn’t just the property on land that was affected.

In November, State Police reported more than 1,000 recreational boats were ripped from their docks and swept miles from shore out onto the water, or in wildlife refuges, marshes or on land.

Police began efforts to help owners locate and reclaim their boats that went missing after the storm brought damaging high winds and large amounts of water to the region. And a few months later the efforts have had some success.

Though only about 15 percent of the boats had been recovered by Nov. 30, Sgt. Stephen Jones, spokesman for the State Police, said last week the numbers have increased.

Out of 640 missing boats reported to the Point Pleasant barracks, 550 have been recovered; and 440 of 690 missing boats from the Ocean Township Station have been located, he said.

That means 990 out of 1,330 known missing boats, or 74 percent, have been located.

Anyone attempting to locate a lost or abandoned vessel should contact the State Police Point Pleasant barracks at 732-899-5051.

Staff Writer Wallace McKelvey contributed to this story.

Contact Joel Landau:

609-272-7215

Follow Joel Landau on Twitter @landaupressofac