The synchronized dance of Kenneth Scribner’s fingers over a keyboard filled the air with light jazz in the early hours of the Historical Society’s Art in the Park event Saturday, Sept. 22, in Mays Landing.

Scribner, of Mays Landing, also brought his trumpet to play more upbeat tunes later in the day, he said.

“I’m just easing into it. I’m going to watch the crowd’s reactions,” Scribner said.

The soothing music complemented the pleasant, clear morning, with tents surrounding the large fountain at Memorial Park, located at the corner of Main Street and Route 50.

The event also marked the release of the first ever audio recording obtained from the opening of a time capsule two years ago.

The Township of Hamilton’s society opened a 50-year-old time capsule in September 2010, marking the township’s 300th anniversary. Amid the various items found, an old audio reel was found. On that reel were interviews of residents and members of the community ranging from school children to the mayor, said society board member Dottie Kinsey.

The reel was full of mud when it was uncovered, since the time capsule had cracked, Kinsey said. In addition, paper documents that were in the capsule were ruined from water that seeped into the capsule.

Luckily, a majority of the paper documents had duplicates already in the town’s museum, Kinsey said. But the reel was severely damaged.

Two years after being sent to a company in North Jersey the society was able to release a CD with the contents of the reel at the event Saturday, Kinsey said.

“Whatever money we were able to get from donations” paid for the creation of the CDs, Kinsey said. “None of this was done for money.”

The money collected paid for about 50 copies of the CD, which sold for $12 at Saturday’s event.

“The thing you have to understand is that the 250th was a community event,” Kinsey said.

She was on the committee for the celebration in 1960 and therefore had known about and remembered the time capsule. It is unknown how many other time capsules may be buried in the area pre-dating the 1960 one, but newer ones have been buried which will be opened in as soon as 30 years.

There was one buried in about 1992, Kinsey said.

Baked goodies, jewelry, lawn and home decorations, clothing and various hand-crafted products were also on sale at the event Saturday.

Families sat on benches to enjoy the atmosphere or visited vendors to inquire about items on sale.

Dawn Baranowski rode her bicycle with both her husband and brother-in-law from Ocean City and happened to notice the park was full.

Baranowski stopped at a table full of pies, which set her dessert for the night.

The baker, Dawn Robinson, of Burleigh, has a home-based catering service which is currently undergoing permitting in Cape May, she said.

A separate kitchen in her backyard was created so she can bake the quantities required for a show or large event, Robinson said.

She baked 61 mid-sized pies for Saturday’s event.

“It took me about two to three days,” she said.

The event lasts till 4 p.m.