LAS VEGAS — Casino technology has changed much since the first Global Gaming Expo, but what hasn’t changed are the relationships Northfield recruiter Beth Deighan has built since attending the first trade show more than a decade ago.

“We come so that we can see our customers in person,” said Deighan, the president of Casino Careers on New Road.

The four-day expo, which wrapped up Thursday, is known as one of the industry’s largest trade shows, drawing casino industry professionals from around the world, including the Atlantic City area. Several locals in attendance said the show, which was first held annually beginning in 2001, was one of the larger, energizing and more organized ones in recent years.

“The event planners did a much better job of communicating (with attendees),” said Eddie Llambias, the general manager of Trump Plaza in Atlantic City, who attended the expo at the Sands Convention Center.

In addition to conferences on a number of gambling topics, the expo provided the best networking opportunity for Atlantic City professionals to meet with others in the field from across the country and world.

Deighan as well as other locals, such as Lloyd Levenson, whose Atlantic City law firm sponsors some of the conference sessions, said they come specifically because they know the expo may be the only time during the year they will have a face-to-face conversation with their clients.

Others, such as Llambias, walk the exhibit floors to explore some of the new slot machines being marketed and learn of new developments in the industry. The emergence of electronic table games was one that caught his interest.

“They are becoming a legitimate choice of casino managers,” Llambias said.

Atlantic City already has a few examples, such as rapid roulette at Caesars, but there is the potential for more in the future, he said. During one conference session, industry professionals learned of the popularity of some electronic table games in Asia. Around some of the game tables are stadium-style seats in which gamblers are able to wager on the outcome.

One reason electronic games have gained in popularity is the elimination of the dealer watching over every hand. That can be an attractive option for patrons who are novices to the game and are fearful of making a mistake in front of someone. The game also reduces the cost for the casinos and reduces the time waiting for a dealer.

“It speeds up the game,” Llambias said.

In addition, in New Jersey, revenues from table games and slot machines are taxed at the same rate, making it an even more attractive option, especially on weekends when crowds build and casinos want to offer another option to table gamblers, he said.

Contact Hoa Nguyen:

609-272-7203