OCEAN CITY — The city debuted the newly restored U.S. Life Saving Station 30 during the First Night ceremonies Sunday that gave visitors a glimpse into what rescue tactics were like off the coast before the formation of the U.S. Coast Guard.

The station, located at Fourth Street and Atlantic Avenue, operated in Ocean City from 1885 to 1915 as part of the U.S. Life Saving Service, the predecessor to the Coast Guard.

The effort to acquire and restore the building took years, according to John Loeper, one of the people who helped restore it. The restored life-saving station features several artifacts that re-create the life and work of federal employees who worked there and and went out to sea to help people stranded by shipwrecks.

“I didn’t have gray hair when we started this project. It’s been a long haul,” Loeper joked. “But it’s something now that the city can be proud of.”

There were originally 42 stations up and down the coast of New Jersey. But bad weather, coupled with abandonment of the buildings, has whittled that number down to nine or 10 left, Loeper said.

One of the remaining stations is next to the Hereford Inlet Lighthouse in North Wildwood.

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Contact: 609-272-7260 JDeRosier@pressofac.com Twitter @ACPressDeRosier

I joined The Press in January 2016 after graduating from Penn State in December 2015. I was the sports editor for The Daily Collegian on campus which covered all 31 varsity sports and several club sports.

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