Halloween Saturday in Somers Point was not quite as scary as normal, but the trick-or-treaters were excited about the chance to finally get some candy.

“I think it’s good after everything for them to have the opportunity,” said Kinga Lookenbill, of Somers Point.

Her husband, Jacob, disagreed on the point of it taking place during daylight hours.

“It should be dark out,” he said. “The fact that they made it when it’s still light out is just lame.”

They were almost out of candy by 5 p.m. and ready to get on the road with their two daughters. Trick-or-treaters were actively seeking out their treats, despite the chilly weather Saturday afternoon.

Halloween was rescheduled to take place in Somers Point on Saturday between the hours of

3 and 6 p.m., based on a recommendation by police Chief Michael Boyd. Mayor Jack Glasser said Friday that for the safety of the residents, it was scheduled to take place during daylight hours. In addition, it allowed the city to schedule three hours, rather than just two if it had gone with the governor’s executive order and moved trick-or-treating to Monday.

Jacob Lookenbill added it was better that the city scheduled Halloween closer to the actual date. “If it gets deeper into the month then its not Halloween anymore,” he said.

“It does take on a little bit of a different atmosphere,” said Somers Point police Officer James Shields, who was patrolling in his car.

“I can see everything a lot better and don’t have to turn the spotlights on,” he said. “We do have more traffic than if it were later” because cleaning crews were still out and people were still traveling along the roadways at the time.

But, overall, the turnout was just a little less than average for a normal Halloween, Shields said.

“We’ve had some laughs as well,” said Karen Sundra, of Linwood, holding up cans of soda.

Some residents were unprepared and gave out what they could, such as cans, toys and coloring books.

“I didn’t get chocolate I only got a ball,” piped up 4-year-old Jack Traa, standing with his mother, Grace, and the Sundras.

“I don’t think it would have made little difference if we had kept it Monday,” Shields said. “Either way some people would have been unprepared.

“A lot of people said ‘We thought it was Monday,’” said Arlene Frambes.

Visitors from neighboring towns were spotted around the area, maximizing the convenient weekend day.

“Initially Linwood had planned for Saturday too, but then they changed to Monday,” said Steve Sundra. Since he and his family planned to be out of town on Monday, it was convenient to jump on board for Somers Point’s Halloween.

“It’s different because you can actually see the different groups of people,” Karen Sundra said.

“I like it more when it’s dark,” said her son, Breiten, 11.

The group of trick-or-treaters with Frambes was still enthusiastic about the afternoon, despite initial complaints of going out so early, she said.

Most of the downed lines were phone or cable lines, not power lines, Shields said. The groups were seen maneuvering around piles of leaves and downed branches.

“I was afraid no one was going to show up, but I was amazed at how quickly we ran out of candy,” said Becky Jenkins. Her husband and two children were with her making rounds in the neighborhood after they ran out of candy, just an hour and a half after Halloween began in the city.

But, Jenkins said, they would not be out for long so she could get “Chilly” Billy, 3, the ice cream man, and Mackenzie, 8 months, an ice cream cone, back into the warmth of their home.

Contact Anjalee Khemlani:

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