A weekly update of stories previously reported

Four Years Ago: Man who cursed at judge violates parole

On March 21, 2009, Absecon resident Nicholas Barbera, then 24, was sentenced to four years in prison for robbing a bank next to his childhood home.

And he wasn’t happy about it.

After Superior Court Judge James Isman sentenced him to the middle of the three to five years that came with the second degree robbery charged he pleaded guilty to, Barbera — who had hoped for a three year sentence — showed his displeasure in court.

“Hopefully, (the appeals court) will be fairer than you. Because I think you’re a (two-word expletive).”

The response prompted Assistant Prosecutor Anne Crater to state if there was any motion that could be made to take back the plea, she would make it.

Barbera was eventually released on March 10, 2012, according to state Department of Corrections records, but he is back in prison for violating his parole.

Absecon police Chief David Risley said Barbera was arrested on Feb. 15 during a motor vehicle stop in which police discovered a shotgun in his vehicle. Barbera confirmed to police the shotgun was his, and that he was currently on parole, Risley said.

Barbera is now at South Woods State Prison in Bridgeton, according to the DOC. He will be eligible for parole again on Nov. 14 and his maximum release date is March 9, 2015.

Nineteen Months Ago: Hamilton Township works to improve appearance of major intersection

In August 2011, Hamilton Township officials worked on a plan to make Gaskill point — the intersection of Route 40, County Road 559 and Main Street in downtown Mays Landing near the Great Egg Harbor River — a more aesthetically pleasing entranceway for the section of the township.

The township took a long-awaited step a month ago by erecting a stone electronic message board in the center of the intersection. The township can use the sign to inform motorists of several different happenings, including community events, police warnings and traffic and weather updates, said Administrator Mike Jacobs.

The sign cost the township about $30,000, and the township’s Municipal Utilities Authority also paid for some of the cost, he said.

The township hopes to add additional electronic signs in other sections of the township, Jacobs said.

“So far, everyone loves it,” he said. “It fits in well with the stone and everything.”

Thirteen Months Ago: Wildwood Crest attempts to create its own logo

Last year, Wildwood Crest set aside $5,000 in its budget to work with a professional firm to create a new logo. The plan is to use the logo to market the shore community — much like Ocean City’s colorful flip-flop logo and the Wildwoods’ wavelike W.

But a year later no decision has been made.

Wildwood Crest Clerk Kevin Yecco said the process is still ongoing and some suggestions have been made. Commissioner Joyce Gould is now working on the project to develop more possibilities and see if an alternative could be reached, he said.

A logo could be selected by the spring, he said.