Two Ocean County municipalities hope there's enough David Breeden to go around this spring.

In addition to his full-time duties as Barnegat Township administrator, Breeden is on loan to Ocean Township as part-time acting administrator from April 1 through June 30.

Ocean Township will pay Barnegat $52.50 per hour for Breeden's services, but Breeden himself will not see a penny of it.

"In difficult economic times right now, it's my contribution," Breeden said during Monday night's Barnegat Township Committee meeting, where the arrangement was formally approved. "There's no question it's going to be a heavy lift."

Breeden will spend about 40 hours per week in Barnegat and at least 10 hours in Ocean Township, he said. Ocean Township has not had a permanent administrator since September, said Joe Lachawiec, its mayor.

"We realized we do need some help," Lachawiec said. "We want him to look over the budget with a fine-tooth comb."

Lachawiec's goal for the 2010 budget, which will be introduced at the end of the month, is no tax increase and no layoffs.

Ocean may be getting a bargain. The hourly rate of $52.50 would equate to about $110,000 for a full-time year. Breeden's Barnegat salary is $159,191.

"It seems natural to share. Waretown saves money, Barnegat generates revenue," Breeden said.

Barnegat is further investigating other shared-services agreements with the township school district and other municipalities, Mayor Jeff Melchiondo told residents.

Lachawiec said he wants a part-time, not full-time, administrator for the foreseeable future. The township employs about 70 people, a number that has shrunk in recent years.

"We want to see how David works out. We may ask him to stay on," Lachawiec said.

Ocean Township fired administrator Ken Mosca in September, then enlisted former Lacey Township administrator John Adams in the fall, but in 2010 it has had no administrator, Lachawiec said.

Barnegat's committee on Monday also introduced a $500,000 proposal to build more and better sidewalks, with the goal of encouraging more students to walk to school, thus saving on transportation costs.

Members approved severance payments totaling $398,000 to two retiring detectives - the final two police officers whose contracts predate a 2004 limit on selling back comp time, Breeden said.

The committee also saw a budget presentation from Dean Allison, the business administrator of schools. As previously announced, the district will cut 41 positions after cutting 26 employees last year.

"This is not good news for either the taxpayer or the student, but we're doing the best we can," Allison said.

Superintendent Jason Bing was scheduled to give the presentation, but he dislocated his jaw, Allison said.

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