Gov. Chris Christie and his cabinet officials will visit Long Beach Island Wednesday to survey storm damage in its six municipalities.

Christie’s appearances follows an appeal by the island’s mayors that the governor reopen the island to residents.

At 11 a.m., Christie will start the survey of the island and will hold a northeaster preparation press briefing at the High Point Volunteer Fire Company in Harvey Cedars, the release stated.

"I think it's great. We got a great town. I think that somebody's noticed that. I think that there's attention being paid to our beach project because the Army Corps is trucking in a lot of sand to the beaches. These beachfill projects have made a huge difference in the reduction of damage," Mayor Jonathan Oldham.

Oldham said he wants to get the town back to normal and to get people home.

"I understood that the governor flew over and was impressed when he flew over the coast and saw those that had replenishment didn't have a whole lot of damage," he said.

Ship Bottom Mayor William Huelsenbeck said Tuesday that the island’s mayors have written the governor, asking him to remove restrictions to the island.

"We want to get the people back to their homes as soon as possible," Huelsenbeck said.

A mandatory evacuation by the state closed barrier islands to public and residents last week and only limited access has been permitted over the last week.

"We've kicked butt and took names and now it's time to come back to the island," said Long Beach Township Mayor Joseph Mancini.

In order to have that mandate lifted the towns had to send a letter to the Christie, Mancini said. Beach Haven Mayor Chuck Maschal was the only mayor that did not sign the letter because he said the borough has sustained the most damage of any municipality on the island.

"We asked for it to be lifted effective Friday, but are expecting that it could be later in the weekend," Mancini said.

Long Beach Island was hit hard by Hurricane Sandy, with massive power outages, major beach erosion and extensive destruction of homes.

Natural gas service to the island remains cut off and crews are working to restore electrical service.

So far, residents have only been allowed briefly back on the island to inspect their homes and secure them. Friday, homeowners and residents from the heavily damaged Holgate and North Beach sections will be able to return to their homes.

Tuesday, officials across Long Beach Island had public works crew picking up debris Tuesday removed from homes and placed at the curb when homeowners returned here yesterday for the first time since Hurricane Sandy struck.

In front of homes across the island are furniture, mattresses, wood, flooring and rugs. Officials from the six municipalities are concerned the debris could pose a problem by being thrown if a northeast storm expected Wednesday through Thursday is strong.

Long Beach Township Mayor Joseph Mancini said residents were supposed to remove only perishables from their home for trash pickup.

"It's all just everywhere out there and that's how its going to be for a while. It's everything from mattresses and furniture to sheet rock," said Andy Baron, superintendent of Long Beach Township Public Works.

Mancini said when homeowners and residents return to Holgate and North Beach Friday he is stressing that they not throw out the contents of their home yet and to stay off the beach.

"We've got everyone and their mother picking stuff up and dumping it at the Acme site," Mancini said.

"People had a few hours here and they tried to do whatever they could at their homes yesterday," said Harvey Cedars Mayor Jonathan Oldham.

Monday morning, Oldham said, crews had more debris in the borough than they were able to pick up.

"We hired extra trucks because we knew this was going to happen and their was going to be a lot of debris," Huelsenbeck said.

All of the debris residents and business removed from their properties over the last few days is gone after extra trash pickups and dumpsters were delivered, Huelsenbeck said. The borough returned to the regular Tuesday garbage pickup schedule, he said.

"People were over here for eight hours and it was human nature that they were going to put it all out at the curb," he said.

Long Beach Island Health Department Director Tim Hilferty the island's next disposal concern is hazardous materials from homes and garages.

All of the perishable waste from restaurants including rotten food has been removed from the island after businesses cleaned out properties over the last day, Hilferty said. The rotten food posed health concerns that include insects and other issues.

"We're working with the county Emergency Environmental Services to establish a location to move these materials to so they're not thrown out with the regular garbage," Hilferty said.