Sandy relief fund

sounds like a racket

The March 11 article, "Christie fund for Sandy relief not giving yet," really highlights the growing problem of charities and nonprofits. Anyone can start one, and no one seems to pay attention to where the money goes.

So let me understand this: Mary Pat Christie, the governor's wife, starts the Hurricane Sandy New Jersey Relief Fund, which takes its skim off the top and then passes the money on to other charities.

It makes me wonder how many other charities the money goes through before it actually gets to the intended recipients, and how much money is left by then.

It makes me wonder why she couldn't have just urged people to give money to the established charities to begin with.

Oh right, because then she could not have given a nice $160,000 job as head of the fund to a friend of hers, along with four other jobs to political insiders.

And it is going to take Hurricane Sandy New Jersey Relief Fund at least three years to distribute this money? So three years of a cushy guaranteed job for Mary Pat Christie's former chief of staff, Cam Henderson, paid for by money people gave to help storm victims.

What a racket. Sounds like a story line for "The Sopranos."

JANIS HETRICK

Scullville

Plans for Sandy fund

weren't fully explained

Regarding the March 11 story, "Christie fund for Sandy relief not giving yet":

Gov. Chris Christie came to the aid of his wife, Mary Pat, and praised her efforts in establishing and implementing the Hurricane Sandy New Jersey Relief Fund, which has raised more than $32 million but has not disbursed any funds yet.

For the most part, relief funds for natural disasters are disbursed in a timely manner. The donations of this particular fund will be given out to various groups of a period of years. This is definitely the exception, not the norm.

But the brouhaha concerning the fund could have been avoided from the outset if the plans for disbursement were made public when the fund was established.

It's unfortunate a press release didn't clearly inform the public of the fund's intent from the very start.

DAVID M. LEVIN

Vineland