Brigantine, replace

memorial benches

Now that the seawall is being repaired from the effects of Hurricane Sandy, will Brigantine replace the memorial benches that were there before the storm?

I brought this issue up at a City Council meeting, and a couple of firefighters volunteered to contribute to the cause. But I was told to wait until plans were in place for the reconstruction.

Several years ago, there were memorial plaques under the trees at Roosevelt Circle. One day, I went there to plant flowers and noticed the memorials were gone.

After many phone calls, I learned they were removed because the Public Works Department found it difficult to mow the lawn. No notice or reimbursement was provided. However, thanks to my councilman at the time, Sam Storino, I received another memorial plaque placed under a tree at the Brigantine Library.

Unfortunately, Storino has since retired. Now who will right this wrong? If the benches cannot be replaced, perhaps another monument can be constructed with the names of family members and residents of the island.

Will Brigantine do the right thing?

ANGELA DI SOMMA

Brigantine

Flood insurance

should be mandatory

It is disappointing to hear that many people are still not back in their homes 18 months after Hurricane Sandy.

A lot of people suffered as a result of the devastation caused by Sandy, including me. Our loss was mitigated by the fact that we had flood insurance.

If the Obama administration can force U.S. citizens to pay for health insurance, why can't we force people who live in flood prone areas to have flood insurance, regardless of whether there is a mortgage on the property or not?

Appealing to the generosity of volunteers instead of paying for flood insurance appears to be the easy way out for many people. The value of the roof over your head is second only to the value of your health, and it should be insured accordingly.

DENNIS J. BRENNAN

Margate

Programs needed

to recruit physicians

Regarding the April 14 Charles Ornstein column, "Use new data to research doctors":

The column deals with a new government program aimed at doctors, part of the Affordable Care Act. Why does the government need another program when there already is oversight by state medical boards, Medicare and such websites as Yelp, Healthgrades and ProPublica?

Why? Because the government spends and spends on programs that are not needed. What is needed is support for efforts to recruit doctors for underserved areas of our country, to attract young people to go to medical school and to recruit young doctors to enter specialty services in OB/GYN, neurosurgery and other high-risk practices.

Instead, we are doing everything possible to scare off promising young students from entering medical school. It is time the government woke up.

DR. GEORGE A. ZITNAY

Cape May Court House

Don't environmentalists

have to use electricity?

Regarding the April 23 story, "Ecogroups: B.L. England must close":

After reading this story, in which protesters in Beesleys Point decried the use of fossil fuels and called for the closing of the B.L. England power plant, I wondered how many in the small group arrived in electric- or natural-gas-powered vehicles.

Then I thought how ironic it would be if the electricity came from the B.L. England plant and the natural gas was the result of the hydraulic fracturing process. Perish the thought.

DENNIS MILLER

Estell Manor

2013 attack on grid

has been ignored

During the anniversary of the Boston marathon bombing, I was reminded of another terrorist act committed the following day, which received little coverage and has since been ignored.

On April 16, 2013, the Metcalf transmission substation in San Jose, Calif., was attacked by heavily armed gunmen in a coordinated act of sabotage. After cutting telephone cables, the gunmen opened fire on 17 transformers with more than 100 rounds from AK47s. The results disabled the substation, which took a month to repair.

A former chairman of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission called it "the most significant incident of domestic terrorism involving the grid that has ever occurred." The FBI has refrained from calling it terrorism. Shell casings left at the scene contained no fingerprints, and to date no suspects have been apprehended.

Was this a harbinger of things to come? Our national electrical grid is poorly protected and is very vulnerable to attack. Although there are hundreds of transformers in the United States, an attack on just a few key sites could cause wide-scale blackouts.

Very little has been done to protect the grid. The recommended safeguards would be a small price to keep the grid safe and prevent devastating blackouts.

JAMES M. SPICKARD

Tuckerton