Food and Wine fest

short on food, wine

Every year I look forward to attending the Atlantic City Food and Wine Festival at Caesars Entertainment properties.

This year I had some dear friends visiting from Lake Tahoe, Calif., during the festival. I looked forward to showing them a great time at the kickoff event at The Pool at Harrah's. If you ask any of my friends, they will tell you that I am Mr. Do AC.

Unfortunately, in The Pool area there was a constant circle of people awaiting probably 20 food stations. A constant circle means that wherever you decide to enter, you would be butting in line.

So we went looking for the wine tables. I asked an employee and was told there was one table of the free wine and three cash bars. I replied, "Does free wine cost $55?" He laughed.

To say the least, there was no way to get near that one table. What an embarrassing event for me in front of my West-Coast friends.

Don't get me wrong. I am glad there were so many people at the event, but I think organizers could give attendees more bang for their buck.



Christie's 'comeback'

has failed N.J. workers

Gov. Chris Christie promised to make New Jersey business-friendly, supposedly to create jobs for the middle class.

He cut business taxes by over $2 billion, allowed businesses to ignore environmental regulations, restricted collective bargaining rights of public employees, reduced actions against industrial polluters and gave millions in tax breaks to the failing Revel Casino-Hotel.

The result has been unemployment that ranks 45th-worst in the nation. Wages have increased nationally 4.7 percent, but they have only increased 2.9 percent in New Jersey. The state has 54,000 fewer jobs than in pre-recession 2008. Rail and bus commuter fares have increased as have tolls on bridges, tunnels and roads. Property taxes have increased 19 percent since 2010. And reports the state's debt of $282 billion is the fourth-highest in the nation.

Christie is obviously in denial that his New Jersey comeback is a failure. Four more years? No thanks!



Negative campaigning

always fails in 1st District

When will Republican state Senate candidate Susan Adelizzi-Schmidt and her handler, Michael J. Donohue, chairman of the Cape May County Regular Republican Organization, realize that throwing mud and always being negative is not the way to win an election in the 1st District? Donohue has failed with this tactic before and now he is making his handpicked team follow his negative path.

The voters of the 1st District are fiercely independent and they can spot phonies very quickly. The negative attacks are just replays from the past campaigns. They are fooling no one.

Voters deserve to know the positives. It is time for candidates to run on the issues, not rely on mud-throwing.


Mays Landing

Big Pharma holds back

medicinal marijuana

Gov. Chris Christie has delayed the implementation of medicinal marijuana distribution for almost two years.

Politicians don't want to see this system in place because of the campaign money supplied by the pharmaceutical industry. The pharmaceutical companies have our politicians, including those in Washington, right where they want them.

Yet legal drugs are a major source of drug-trafficking and deaths. Many people who get prescription drugs turn around and sell these dangerous drugs on the street. Ask yourself, how many people do you know who have died from using marijuana?

Many illnesses can be helped with a small dose of marijuana under the supervision of medical professionals - without the addiction and dependency associated with many prescription drugs.

Why do we continue to re-elect politicians who are on the sides of big pharmaceutical companies?

I'd rather have my doctor prescribe what he thinks is good for the patient than a politician make that choice.