A.C. fire chiefs deserve

a vote of confidence

Regarding the Dec. 13 story, "Vote of no confidence in Atlantic City Fire Department's leaders cast":

My co-worker and I read in disbelief about the Atlantic City Fire Department union's public vote of "no confidence" in Fire Chief Dennis Brooks and Deputy Chief Vincent Granese. During Hurricane Sandy, we worked six straight days in the fire chief's outer office on emergency management phone lines. We were willing to stay and do whatever was required, because the city was in an emergency of extraordinary proportions.

We went home for a few hours and in order to get back to the phone lines one of us was picked up in an asphalt truck, seated with legs straddling the console. The other was picked up in a military truck and sat on a soaking wet bench.

Granese and Councilman George Tibbitt stayed out on the streets in the very worst part of the storm. Without the constant availability of Granese, the tenacity and professionalism of city employee Monica Brock and the decisions made by Brooks, the public would have suffered a much greater hardship.

We are baffled that firefighters would publicly cry about having to change shifts in the middle of the storm, whine about being asked to do whatever it took to get to work and feel it was asking too much of them to ride in a bucket truck.

There were so many dedicated civilians who willingly went the extra mile to be of service. Why are publicly paid firefighters crying? The issues the union had with the chief and deputy chief could have been ironed out privately.

Was one firefighter injured? No. Could things have been done differently? Yes. Will the issues be addressed differently going forward? Almost certainly.

The taxpayers of Atlantic City count on our public safety personnel to be willing to do whatever it takes in a time of need. If some of our firefighters feel that going the extra mile in tough times for city residents is a burden, then maybe it is time for them to rethink their career choice.

We give Brooks and Granese our thanks and our "vote of confidence" for a job well-done in the face of adversity.

ARLENE M. WILKERSON

BETTY J. LEWIS

Atlantic City

This is an opportunity

to close Route 40 motels

Regarding the Dec. 6 letter, "Flooded motels should stay closed":

The motels along Route 40 in West Atlantic City have been a political bone of contention since I was a kid.

I am sure they would never pass any kind of building or health code inspection expected of a modern business. It is an insult to the unfortunate individuals who are forced to stay in them - at no small cost to the public.

How many people have been killed or injured while attempting to cross Route 40 to catch a bus from one of these dungeons? Through eminent domain, pay the owners a fair value minus any Federal Emergency Management Agency money they have collected.

Sandy started the job. Let's finish it off will bulldozers and Dumpsters.

DAVID SYKES

Linwood

Traditional marriage

based on natural law

In reference to the Nov. 22 letter, "Government should never decree religious doctrine":

Does the writer know that the establishment of marriage is not just religious doctrine? Marriage between a man and a woman is according to natural law. It holds our society together, producing future generations.

And speaking of holding us together, do you remember a president named Ronald Reagan who wasn't afraid to talk about his faith and respect for life? He said, "I have found a great hunger in America for a spiritual revival, for a belief that law must be based on a higher law, for a return to tradition and values that we once had."

The writer says we can't decree a doctrine (traditional marriage) that protects future generations because this is called religion, but considers it OK for President Barack Obama to decree an atheistic doctrine that is unnatural and counter to basic human life.

JACQUELINE LONG

Galloway Township