College should pay taxes

on property it purchases

Richard Stockton College and Stockton Affiliated Services Inc. gain financially as nonprofits, but taxpayers have to pay the taxes that subsidize them.

A 1982 law allows state colleges to avoid paying taxes on private property. The college and SASI purchased seven houses in the Pinehurst section of Galloway Township and only pay $6,846 in lieu of municipal taxes. They should be paying all taxes on these houses.

The state Legislature needs to change the 1982 law so that state colleges pay their fair share of taxes. Because the property owners of New Jersey are paying taxes to subsidize Stockton and SASI, which do not pay school, county and municipal taxes, this affects every taxpayer in Atlantic County. The Assembly and Senate need to change the law and make colleges pay taxes on private properties.

CHRISTIE MAGEE

Galloway Township

Promises to watermen

don't come through

I've worked on the waters of the Delaware Bay for decades and have made a pretty good living catching crabs and conchs. When Sandy blew in, it all changed. Some of us lost most or all of the crab pots we use to make a living.

To my surprise, about one week after the storm, U.S. Rep. Frank LoBiondo. R-2nd, showed up at a town meeting. I asked him, "Can you help us?" He said, "Yes, we will take care of you."

The congressman said to call his office, which I did. His staff told me to sign up for disaster unemployment assistance for self-employed people, which I did. In turn, I received a letter saying I was entitled to unemployment from the day of the hurricane until May 2013 or whenever I was about to return to work, whichever came first.

After nine weeks of waiting, I was sent two weeks of unemployment and a letter saying I was not qualified anymore because the storm has passed, so go back to work. I said, "Go back to what work? The storm took all the product away." The state's answer, in effect, was that's the way it goes.

A man from the Department of Labor's Collateral Claims Unit told me, "If you have a house for sale and it doesn't sell, you still have a house." I said, "If a hurricane blows through and takes the house all you have left is a vacant lot with nothing to sell."

LoBiondo said he would take care of the people who work on the water, but in this case I guess not. Thanks a lot for the supposed help.

ERICK BATEMAN

Port Norris

Why does Hollywood make

such violent movies?

Washington is going after the National Rifle Association about guns. I agree that high-powered rifles and guns that shoot many rounds should be banned.

But I don't think guns are the biggest problem. I think we should be looking at the producers in Hollywood who are making the movies that young people see. Nothing but shooting, killing and blood. Why are we making such awful movies? Even though they are rated R, no one stops teenagers from going to see them.

The producers of these horror movies should take a lesson from movies such as "Lincoln," "Les Miserables" and "Silver Linings Playbook," which are great and have already won many awards. The theaters I saw them in were packed. We need more true stories and family movies and musicals in theaters.

DIANE HANNUM

Margate

One writer's perdition

is another's progress

Regarding the Feb. 2 letter, "The more liberals win, the more the U.S. loses":

The writer cites many of the major and proposed changes in society as the work of liberals and evidence that the country is on the road to perdition.

The writer mentions the legalization of abortion, the broadening of religious tolerance to respect the rights of non-believers at public gatherings, the recognition of gay rights, the inclusion of women in military combat, the proposed ban on assault weapons and admission of hard-working undocumented immigrants to full citizenship. Going even further back, however, we come to the repeal of Prohibition, the adoption of Social Security, granting women the right to vote and the freeing of slaves, all of which were ardently resisted by the conservatives of the day.

It would seem that many of these current and proposed changes will have to await the arrival of future generations to be universally recognized for what they are: progress.

DON GIBBONS

Manahawkin