Pregnant rape victims

should keep baby

Regarding the Feb. 5 letter, "Abortion bill is a violation," about a New Mexico bill that would require a victim of rape to carry a pregnancy to term as evidence in a sexual assault trial:

I completely agree that a woman or underage girl who is a victim of rape suffers severe trauma.

However, the baby - and it is a baby that has been conceived - should not be another victim of violence and abortion. If the baby is aborted, not only is the baby subjected to violence, the rapist could go unpunished since there is little evidence of the crime.

Today thousands of couples are looking to adopt babies. The mother who has undergone the terrible trauma of rape and keeps the baby will realize that, in the end, she will not only give an innocent baby life but will also give a couple an opportunity to share their love with a baby they desperately want but never had.

There are many children born of rape who today are productive citizens and are thankful that their mother chose not to abort.

Rebecca Kiessling is an international pro-life speaker and attorney who was conceived in rape. Her website contains her story and testimonials of other conceived-in-rape individuals. I pray that women who are raped will find healing and that all women who find themselves pregnant will be willing to give their babies life.

MARIE KONCHAN

Little Egg Harbor Township

Minimum wage

a question of justice

I follow and enjoy Kevin Post's "Bottom Line" column, but I do take issue with the Feb. 17 piece, "Minimum wage study relied on narrow sample."

I submit that the issue of increasing the minimum wage involves factors of worker justice as well as the purely economic factor of employers hiring fewer people when they have to pay existing employees more.

If existing employees are being paid at a level so low that it is not a just wage, that becomes a key factor. Proposed minimum-wage increases are woefully behind what affected workers deserve, while employers' incomes have been increasing enormously and disproportionately.

Workers are human resources and partners of enterprises, not just bundles of muscle and bone or items on a balance sheet. Democratic lawmakers in the state Legislature are taking the constitutional-amendment route primarily because affected employers and Gov. Chris Christie haven't dealt humanely with this issue.

KIMBALL BAKER

Egg Harbor Township

Sequestration 'cuts'

are a phony crisis

First it was "too big to fail" and bailouts, then the debt-ceiling crisis and the fiscal cliff. Now its sequestration. Saul Alinsky's "Rules for Radicals" teaches to always have a crisis and a demon to fight or blame.

It may be too late when Americans realize the sky isn't really falling, and this week's "crisis" is all trickery to gain support for a big-spending agenda.

Simply put, if your budget is growing by 5 percent, and sequestration reduces that growth by 2 percent, then it is not a cut. It is a reduction in the rate of growth - except in Washington in 2013.

President Barack Obama claims the $85 billion sequester cut - his creation, by the way - will render thousands of teachers, firefighters and EMTs unemployed. He claims that 100,000 people will lose preventive care, and Medicare patients will lose treatment. He says the cuts would be devastating to our economy and blames the Republicans, even though sequestration was his proposal for solving the debt-ceiling crisis.

Why do journalists let politicians, not just Obama, get away with this stuff? The media should help the public wade through the baloney, not spread it. We are $16 trillion in debt, our budget is $3.8 trillion, and an $85 billion "cut" is a drop in the bucket.

VAUGHAN M. REALE

Margate

Change struggling Revel

to 'low roller' casino

I am one of many Atlantic City residents who enjoy the challenge and the perks of gambling. But for us "low rollers," it is difficult to find low minimum-bet tables in Atlantic City. Las Vegas has always had low minimum-bet casinos available. With all of the empty tables at the Revel, I suggest it open an economy casino where everyone can gamble at low minimum bets.

I guarantee the casino will flourish, and the tables will be full. Many of us enjoy the challenge and the fun of gambling without risking lots of money. I know the profits for Revel will be reduced, but the overwhelming volume will make it worthwhile for the casino. I'm sure many people will agree to come to a low-stakes casino.

MILTON STEIN

Atlantic City

Buena Vista purchased

expensive white elephant

Just prior to the arrival of Hurricane Sandy, Buena Vista Township officials purchased a generator to provide portable emergency power for the Martin Luther King Center in Newtonville. My initial reaction was supportive - until I discovered the cost and factory specifications associated with the already-acquired generator.

The generator has both single- and three-phase capability with a starting capacity of 13,000 watts and a running capacity of 10,000 watts. This generator cost the taxpayers a hefty $5,000 with a delivery cost of $500, which did not include the required battery.

As a member of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 351, I know that the average home in my neighborhood would require between 15,000 and 20,000 watts of running capacity, making this generator completely inadequate for the King Center, which has a massive electrical footprint.

This generator, although well-intended, appears to be the pet project of Peter Bylone, then the mayor, and Deputy Mayor Richard Harlan. I believe this purchase was made with unnecessary haste and absent the appropriate professional planning that should have occurred. Unfortunately, Buena Vista Township residents now own a very expensive white elephant.

Local politicians speak regularly about their professionalism, efficiency and hands-on government, but the details surrounding this generator tell a much different story.

STEVE MARTINELLI SR.

Buena Vista Township