Bring baggy-pants ban

to A.C. Boardwalk

Regarding the ban on sagging pants on the Wildwood Boardwalk:

I support this ban, and ask for your support in banning this in Atlantic City as well.

I understand this look is a trend in the urban culture, but it has been accepted and copied across all demographics and extends beyond teens. I don't believe in stereotypes, but I know others do and associate this style with a "thug" personality.

When I want to go to the beach and stroll the Boardwalk with my family - which includes my young daughter - I don't want to see your underwear and sometimes your butt crack. It's totally inappropriate. The style has run its course.

If you have rules stating "no shoes, no shirt, no service," I feel it can be extended to state "no sagging pants" as well. I'm all for a fashion statement, but let's have one that elicits a positive response.

TEESHA COOPER

Willingboro

New crosswalk law

misunderstood, misused

Regarding the July 18 story, "Last walk left legacy/Ocean City crosswalk safer after fatal crash results in Casey's Law":

What a great honor to Casey Feldman that her loved ones worked to enact a law concerning safety. But as a Downbeach resident, I find there are too many people who abuse the law. I don't understand why there aren't more accidents due to this law.

During a typical drive through Margate and Longport, you see people walking and stopping traffic at places other than a crosswalk. I had someone walk through two cars in the middle of Atlantic Avenue giving me the finger for not stopping.

The numbers don't lie if you say deaths are down, but the law has many of us going crazy. Maybe we can distribute information that the law is for designated crosswalks and not wherever you feel like stepping off the curb.

NANCY LEVINE

Atlantic City

Criticism of tattoos

was way off base

Regarding the July 18 letter, "There are worse things than droopy pants":

I am offended that the mother of two boys, who states she neither condones or endorses the trend of saggy pants, dares to compare a heavyset woman in a bikini "covered with jailhouse tattoos" to her kid's bum hanging out for all to see.

A good portion of my body, at great expense and done by a professional artist who wasn't practicing her craft in a jail cell, is inked. I am not heavyset, but that is an aside. Who is this person who walks the Earth judging others in such a way? I'd like to keep her out of not only my circle of friends, but away from my children. Her mean-spirited opinions of what are right and wrong should be kept to herself.

Yes, there are worse things than droopy pants - small-minded people.

ADRIAN ROGERSON

Ocean City

Pit bulls respond

to their upbringing

Regarding the July 17 letter, "No, pit bulls are not like any other dog":

The writer tells only half the story of these much-maligned animals.

Yes, people who take part in dog-fighting try to selectively breed for more aggressive animals that have a stronger propensity toward fighting, but this does not explain the many peaceful, loving dogs that still come from their unscrupulous breeding attempts.

Possibly there is something in the nature of these selectively bred animals that might make them more prone to fighting, but the nurturing these animals receive influences their behavior just as strongly - if not more strongly.

We see this time and again in human behavior, too. Someone who is raised by depraved people to feel only fear and to consequently act out aggressively probably will continue to act that way later in life.

STEPHEN D. JOHNSON

Hammonton