Stonewalling Congress

is hurting our country

There is a faction in our country that would rather see the president fail than the United States succeed.

The stonewalling of Congress over the sequester is totally unacceptable. Our economy cannot stand more job cuts. Congress is well on the road to destroying our democratic form of government.

Our representatives are not thinking about the American public, who will suffer for their inactivity. Instead, they think only of partisan politics.

America cannot be strong without a strong military. The budget cuts will weaken an already-weak military. Now is not the time for a decimated military.

More people will suffer from unemployment. The list of negatives is endless.

I believe members of our Congress should remember who elected them, stop the personal attacks among themselves and get on with doing the job they were elected to do. They are supposed to represent all the people, regardless of their political leanings.


West Atlantic City

Margate can't afford

•ew project manager

Regarding the March 1 story, "Margate adds, fills project manager job":

Margate homeowners, in a down economy, are facing the risk of losing their homes due to increasing flood insurance premiums. Why would officials decide to expand the city's bloated payroll with another six-figure salary?

Margate just signed a multi-year contract with its city engineer. Now officials want to create a position for yet another engineer? Margate is barely a one-mile-square patch of sand. Its small year-round population shrinks with each census. Economic reality cries out for consolidation.

This position of project manager is not included in the city's salary ordinance and is not an official Civil Service position. The tax-and-spend mayor willfully flaunts and ignores these laws and ordinances at his own peril.

Right-thinking folks might see the sense of a recall referendum. While other towns are handing out pink slips and earnestly seeking ways to create shared-service arrangements, Margate can't refrain from its out-of-control spendthrift practices. This addled approach drives residents out of Margate. People demand smaller, not larger, government.



Credit union helpful

after storm damage

I am a homeowner who had mortgages through the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority and the South Jersey Federal Credit Union, and I am grateful for this after reading about all of the red tape that the larger banks are putting homeowners through regarding their insurance checks for Hurricane Sandy.

Both of the above-named entities quickly responded and endorsed my insurance checks when they arrived, and funds were made available to pay the contractor without any unnecessary red tape.

I would recommend that anyone who is refinancing a home go through a local credit union and leave those megabanks. They do not support local communities.

I would also add that if you want to donate to victims of the hurricane, you should put the money in the homeowners' hands or give gift cards. Much of the money sent to major fundraising events is not making its way down to South Jersey homeowners.


Atlantic City

Neglecting south end

hurts all of Ocean City

Regarding the Feb. 21 story, "Beach replenishment won't touch south Ocean City/Residents there tired of neglect":

I will not be buying my usual six beach tags until Ocean City's south-end beaches and dunes are fully restored. My visitors are going somewhere else.

At a recent City Council meeting, the members all said they were sympathetic to our situation and realized the loss of revenue that occurs when beaches are not maintained. A few years ago, when south-end residents pleaded with city officials to fix the problem, they ignored us, as usual. But they did help the north end complete its beach project.

These officials forget that by short-changing the south-enders, they are causing the entire city to suffer.

It is too late for anything to happen this year, and it may not get done next year. The renters who help to subsidize all our businesses will not be here. Not one council person or the mayor responded directly to any of the 11 people who spoke about this serious problem. "We are doing our best," our mayor promised. "We are trucking in sand." Thank you, Mr. Mayor, but your best is just not good enough.


Ocean City

Shore homeowners,

resist FEMA's changes

In New York, homeowners in flood zones whose properties were damaged by Tropical Storm Irene are being offered buyouts - with 75 percent of the cost paid by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. The prices are at pre-flood values.

Here in New Jersey, FEMA's erroneous maps, over-reaching house-raising requirements and exorbitant future insurance costs have devalued even undamaged houses by 30 to 50 percent.

In Brick Township, Ocean County, councilmen are confronting FEMA, asserting that the federal bureaucracy that is imposing the expensive requirements should pay for them.

All along the shore, there is a grassroots uprising against the 2012 Biggert-Waters Act, which empowered FEMA to cause more damage than Sandy did. Learn more at

As many as 20 percent of all U.S. residents are affected by these expanding flood zones and onerous requirements.

Please join us so that our voices will be heard from Trenton to Washington.


Little Egg Harbor Township