Liberal policies

destroy work ethic

Obamacare, a minimum-wage increase, re-extended unemployment benefits, excessive welfare payments and unnecessary food stamps are costing us jobs and decreasing the incentive to work.

In spite of the good these liberal programs may provide, there is no doubt that they result in fewer people working.

When you objectively analyze government attempts at redistribution of wealth, you must come to the conclusion that Uncle Sam is a serial job killer. If our economy recovers to the point where anyone who wants to work can find a decent job, it will be in spite of our government's current efforts. rather than because of them.

If our government would get out of the way and let our profit-oriented system work, we would thrive. But instead, we are unconsciously and possibly even deliberately destroying the American work ethic.

Our former desire to be productive and self-reliant made our nation more beneficial for a greater percentage of its people than any nation in the history of mankind. Why then are so many of us not pulling the wagon? Because our government is encouraging more of us to climb aboard and let fewer do the pulling. And we are intent on increasing taxes on the strongest horses.

ETTORE CATTANEO

North Cape May

Don't waste money

on longer school year

According to the Education Commission of the States, most states require 180 or fewer instructional days for students. Gov. Chris Christie wants to entice school districts to lengthen the school day and/or school year by putting $5 million in a special fund and awarding districts through competitive grants.

Until there is conclusive evidence that longer school days or school years will unequivocally produce higher student achievement, the $5 million could be put to better use elsewhere in the budget.

DAVID M. LEVIN

Vineland

Bring back Wildwoods'

old welcome sign

I was born in 1945, and one of my fondest memories of coming to the Wildwoods was getting off the Garden State Parkway at Exit 6. There it was - the "Welcome to the Wildwoods" sign, all lit up.

I can remember the excitement and the happiness of getting here. It seemed to take forever to arrive from Montgomery County, Pa.

Now my children are grown up, but I can still hear them say, "We are here. There's the sign." What a shame someone had to take it down. After all the years, I still miss it.

Maybe the mayors of the Wildwoods can find a way to put it back up. I have to say, of all my memories of the Wildwoods, the Exit 6 sign is at the top.

JAMES J. VERCIO

North Wildwood

Blame Simpson,

•ot shipping law

Regarding the Feb. 25 story, "N.J. transportation commissioner livid old maritime law has N.J. road salt stuck in Maine":

Transportation Commissioner James Simpson said he had attempted to receive a waiver of the Maritime Act of 1920 to allow a foreign-flagged vessel to transport 40,000 tons of salt to New Jersey from Searsport, Maine. American flagged, built and manned vessels are required to transport cargoes between domestic ports, unless they are unavailable and/or it is a matter of national security. Simpson was quoted as being "ticked," that he hadn't "gotten a rational explanation why he didn't get a waiver."

Meanwhile, on Feb. 25 - the previous day - U.S. Sens. Robert Menendez and Cory Booker had issued a press release regarding the debacle. It stated that 10,000 tons had arrived that day in Newark via an American-flagged barge, that they had been in direct conversation with Simpson who never mentioned this situation or asked for help, and that it had become clear that the state Department of Transportation had "fallen short in planning for and addressing its dwindling salt supply."

So the commissioner and his minions didn't properly plan, were unaware of a nearly 100-year-old law that all shippers are aware of, cost the taxpayers $700,000 through their ineptitude, and decided to release a bogus statement of blame that was repeated by a Press staff writer without further research.

In addition, a poorly veiled attack was made on the Jones Act, which has served to protect our national and economic security, not to mention the viability of a dwindling U.S. Merchant Marine.

ED ZELINSKI

Galloway Township

High mortality in O.C.

is no great mystery

Regarding the March 3 letter, "Pollution could increase at plant":

The letter details a "health risk" to Ocean City (why no other communities are affected is not mentioned) from a natural-gas pipeline that would provide fuel to replace coal at the B.L. England Generating Station. Apparently the writer found a report that lists Ocean City 14th highest in mortality among 500 communities downwind of a coal-fired power plant, and he is dumbfounded that his fellow citizens are not excited by this information.

It is surprising that no one pointed out to him that Ocean City is populated by a large number of what are lovingly called senior citizens, many occupying senior-living facilities. In fact, no matter which way the wind blows and what fuel the power company is using, these folks are really good at becoming mortality statistics without help from the power plant.

Moreover, the writer is distressed that the electric plant wants to replace dirty coal fuel with natural gas, which would be used 365 days a year and would pollute the neighborhood with some sort of "ultrafine particles" Once this information gets out, he fears that real estate values will plummet and residents will need to be wearing gas masks.

It is unclear whether these particles are the result of the gas having been produced by a fracking process or they are just the expected result of burning any kind of natural gas or indeed any type of fuel.

In any case it seems everyone in Ocean City should be ordering their gas masks, because this dangerous gas is what most of us are using to heat our homes and it doesn't matter what fuel the electric plant uses. We have been warned.

Anyhow, folks, if we don't have enough to worry about, now we've got to budget for gas masks.

SAMUEL ALLEN

Ocean City