Insurance industry

cannot be trusted

After Hurricane Katrina, my insurance broker informed me that my homeowners insurance was going to be cancelled. The insurance company I had was no longer insuring homes within so many feet of a body of water, in my case the Delaware Bay.

Although I had never filed a claim in 35 years, the insurance company got its money and now it was time to split with the profits.

My broker found me another policy, but it was going to cost $1,800 a year, a $1,200 increase. I eventually got coverage elsewhere for $714 a year, an increase of $114, which I could live with. But my point is the insurance industry is full of thieves working on commissions. So beware.

The opportunistic middle men are out there with their hands in your pockets. Watch out. If they give you an exorbitant increase, shop around.Then call the state Division of Insurance and report it.

I believe the insurance industry should be nationalized.

Take their assets and let the government run it. Give the honest brokers a government job. At least then the industry would not be able to drop your coverage depending on which way the wind blows.

CHARLES D. KING

Villas

Troopers deserved

to be fired for escort

Regarding the March 19 letter, "Police escort safer than unescorted cars," about state troopers escorting a caravan of sports cars down the Garden State Parkway at high speed:

The letter writer said the troopers used the "correct procedure" and should not have been fired.

No, they most certainly did not do the right thing leading a high-speed thrill ride down the parkway. The right thing would have been to pull the unsafe drivers over and issue traffic citations.

No one is above the law, and when these troopers actively participated in this they allowed others to break the law, put innocent motorists in danger and broke the law themselves. They certainly deserved to be fired.

JOHN WORTHINGTON

Millville

Christie's comments

divisive, demeaning

Regarding the March 19 editorial, "Christie vs. Oliver/No racial slight":

Gov. Chris Christie has made a name for himself with his crude name-calling at town halls - "jerk" and "idiot" are just a few examples. He could have gotten his point across about the Opportunity Scholarship Act without stooping to referring to Assembly Speaker Sheila Oliver as the "African-American female speaker."

His comment was intended to be divisive and demeaning.

What would the reaction have been had Oliver responded by saying the "the fat Italian-American Catholic male who opposes abortion in the Governor's Office has been working against women's health initiatives in New Jersey"?

It's time for the governor to grow up, and it's time for race not to be thrown around as an identifier by politicians grandstanding and playing to the crowd.

SHERRY SAUERWINE

Galloway Township

A.C. crumbling

under Langford

I was born and raised in the Inlet section of Atlantic City, and the section of the Boardwalk all along Maine Avenue has been condemned for years.

It was ignored, just like the rest of the city.

This is the fault of Mayor Lorenzo Langford, who doesn't care about anything but raising his salary. Now he is running for office again. If the people of Atlantic City want to keep looking at deplorable conditions, then they should vote again for the very person who put the city in that condition. Or, they could simply oust him, as they should have done years ago.

The city that I love so much is just crumbling before my eyes.

JOE BRENNER

Pleasantville

Letter was unfair

to Sandy victims

Regarding the March 19 letter, "Why should I pay to raise your house":

I am a victim of Hurricane Sandy, as are 4,000 homeowners in my town. I would like to ask the letter writer if he knows what it feels like to lose everything he owns - everything he has worked for his whole life. I do. And I consider his letter a slap in the face to everyone who has been impacted by the storm.

I have paid for flood insurance in addition to homeowners insurance for many years without a claim. Now when I need my insurance company, it is offering me half of what my policy is worth. My house has been declared substantially damaged by my township so it must be lifted or destroyed and rebuilt at 12 feet. This elevation has been determined by the Federal Emergency Management Agency based on the possibility of 3-foot waves on a lagoon. My house has stood where it is for more than 40 years and never has there been a 3-foot wave.

I also resent being categorized as stupid by the letter writer because I own a home on the water. I have not received any government funds or any handouts. If I am able to rebuild, it will be with my savings and the small amount from my insurance company. I have never had to deal with so much red tape and bureaucracy in my life, all to try and collect what I have paid for.

Is the letter writer as upset with the billions of dollars our taxes send yearly to foreign countries where the people don't even like Americans?

SUSAN LAWLER

Mystic Islands

Electric cars generate

more in electricity taxes

Regarding the March 18 story, "Mileage gains are loss for N.J. road fund":

New Jersey collects more state tax from an electric vehicle than it does a gas vehicle. Using the example in the article, a gas vehicle getting 30 miles per gallon and traveling 12,200 miles a year would pay a state tax of $42.70 a year at the current gas tax rate of 10.5 cents a gallon. The owner of an electric vehicle would not buy gas, but would have a higher electric bill. An electric vehicle getting 3 miles per kilowatt-hour traveling 12,200 miles a year would pay an additional state tax of $97.60 a year at the current electricity rate of 16 cents a kilowatt-hour and with the15 percent tax that the state collects on electric bills.

Since state Sen. Jim Whelan, who is sponsoring a mileage tax for electric vehicles, is being open-minded and willing to listen to suggestions, a simple change in accounting can direct the additional tax revenue that the state gets from electric vehicles into the Transportation Trust Fund. Eventually, the Transportation Trust Fund will grow, as more electric vehicles are on the road.

BOB CORSON

Mays Landing