Limited schedule

hampers Cape ferry

Regarding the Cape May-Lewes Ferry:

Last year, I was called by the ferry for a survey. The caller said it was clear that I only used the ferry southbound and rarely northbound and asked why.

I responded that the ferry schedules were terrible.

It takes nearly three hours to drive from the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel in Virginia to the ferry, and I need to be sure that a ferry will be available to cross into New Jersey for the trip home from that area.

So what do the ferry people do? They reduce the winter schedule to only three trips a day, so that the last ferry leaves Lewes in mid-afternoon.

The real issue here is that the ferry has to be reliable. It advertises itself as a destination, rather than a means to move people and cars. There must be an easy, reliable schedule that people can count on.

I suggest every two hours in the winter from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. and every hour until 9 p.m. in the summer.

I know that the Delaware River & Bay Authority does not want to lose money.

But if they don't run the ferries, people can't ride them.

If the schedule were convenient and reliable, I think people would be more willing to use it, and ultimately the ferry would be a money-maker. At least give it a shot.

WILLIAM BURIAN

Cape May Court House

Trees pose danger

on Cumberland road

There are many many dead or dying trees along state Route 347 in Cumberland County. These trees are still standing, and some are approximately 70 to 80 feet tall. If and when these trees fall, they could easily fall across both lanes of traffic.

Aside from the dead or dying trees, I have noticed several others that are leaning a little uncomfortably toward the roadway. Does the county or the state not see this hazard? The county or the state needs to get crews out there to cut these trees down before somebody dies as a result of an accident.

RUSSELL RYAN

North Wildwood

Tanks in Afghanistan

can be sent to Ukraine

There is a plethora of military equipment in Afghanistan waiting to be shipped back to the United States, including tanks.

Ukraine is much closer than America and is in desperate need of modern military weaponry. Shipping this equipment to Ukraine would be a deterrent to Russia making further inroads into that country - and substantially lower our logistical costs.

LUDWIG JAROS

Mays Landing

Pipeline explosion

could destroy Pinelands

Regarding the March 21 letter, "Pinelands pipeline won't harm anything," in support of a 22-mile natural-gas pipeline to the B.L. England power plant in Upper Township:

The letter says there will be "no negative environmental impact to the Pinelands" if the pipeline is built. I disagree. To see the potential for disaster, we need only look north of the border. There have been several instances of natural-gas pipeline explosions in Canada.

On Jan. 26, a TransCanada natural-gas pipeline exploded near Otterburne, Manitoba. Witnesses reported seeing flames shoot nearly 300 meters into the air as a result of the blast. The explosion left nearly 4,000 households without heat, as outdoor temperatures dipped to about minus 11 degrees Fahrenheit.

On July 9, 2009, a different TransCanada pipeline exploded in northern Alberta, burning up about 200 acres of nearby woodlands. And yes, TransCanada is the same company that hopes to build an oil pipeline through the American Midwest.

It isn't hard to imagine the devastation that a similar explosion could wreak on the environmentally sensitive Pine Barrens. The entire area could become nothing but charred cinders.

It is time for New Jersey and the United States to turn to sources of renewable energy. Wind turbines and solar panels would probably create more jobs than construction of a pipeline, without posing risk to the Pinelands.

ELAINE ROSE

Galloway Township

Gas and oil pipelines

inherently dangerous

A pipeline in North Dakota just ruptured, spilling 34,000 gallons of crude oil into the environment. But, not to worry, the company says that the "environmental damage is limited to some contaminated soil." I guess the wildlife won't notice the crude oil.

This is the third accident reported in recent months by the same company, Hiland Crude LLC, including a 21,000-gallon crude-oil spill and a fire at a natural-gas pipeline that ruptured.

There have been scores of ruptures and explosions along natural-gas pipelines throughout the United States and other countries, causing deaths, property loss and environmental damage. The decision to stop the natural-gas pipeline through the Pine Barrens is correct. The Pinelands National Reserve was created to protect the Cohansey Aquifer, the largest clean water supply in the eastern United States, and this type of commercial development is banned by the management plan.

That's why four former governors of New Jersey expressed their opposition to the plan. Natural-gas pipelines are safe until they are not, and then they can destroy whole ecosystems.

The Pinelands should not be risked for the profit margin of the gas company.

GREG LANGAN

Millville

2nd Amendment says

'well-regulated' militia

Regarding the March 18 letter "State cannot edit the Bill of Rights":

The Second Amendment reads, "A well-regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed."

What in this passage don't the gun enthusiasts understand?

We have a well-regulated militia - local police and the National Guard and Army, etc. If one were to include all folks who wish to own a weapon and be included in the "militia," the automatic assumption is that the militia is to be well regulated. That is part of the deal.

If you want to use the Second Amendment, you have to apply the whole idea, not just the pieces of it you like.

I would add that any new owner of a weapon should go through the same training a police officer takes for carrying a weapon and be requalified at least as often as police officers.

ERNEST TEWS

Little Egg Harbor Township