If you live near water,

accept the responsibility

The nonsense about new flood elevations is just another example of the lack of responsibility and the increase in greed among us.

When I bought my house in Brigantine, the first thing I did was check to see the elevation of the first floor. That knowledge and the age of the home were the determining factors in my purchase. My house has been here since 1941 and has been untouched by every storm since.

If someone is stupid enough and greedy enough to think that Mother Nature won't come into their living room if that is where she wants to be, then too bad for them. Move or rebuild at your own expense. Why should my flood insurance premium have to pay for some idiot's stupidity?

Everybody wants to be on the beach or the bay. But these homeowners are responsible for accepting the risks that go along with that, and the municipalities have a responsibility not to allow people to build just because there is a lovely piece of land (sand) available.

This is another example of President Barack Obama's obsession with controlling everyone's life and making the responsible people pay for the sheep that follow him.

BRITA KRIEBEL

Brigantine

Take down the sign

on Margate Causeway

Regarding the March 14 letter, "Causeway sign 'monstrosity of the meadows'":

I cannot imagine what anyone was thinking when allowing this large electronic sign to be erected on the Margate Causeway. As the letter writer says, it's a monstrosity. The tranquility and nature of the area have been utterly destroyed. I plead with the powers that be to do the right thing and remove this sign.

SANDY JOHNSON

Ventnor

CODI workers helpful

at shredding documents

Everything does happen for a reason. Recently I discovered a workplace like no other - Career Opportunity Development Inc. in Egg Harbor City.

Hurricane Sandy caused several leaks to my roof, destroying some Christmas decorations, years of tax returns and other personal records. This also created a need to clean out the attic - but what to do with 144 pounds of personal documents?

My research found that paper shredding is big business and rather expensive. I then discovered CODI, where I was treated with courtesy and professionalism.

Upon arrival, I was greeted or acknowledged in some manner by almost every worker. During a rainstorm, they hauled all 15 boxes from my truck to the two shredders located inside the facility.

I was impressed to see about 100 proud workers stuffing envelopes, shredding papers and doing other tasks.

Three weeks later, I received a bill for $40.40 or 28 cents a pound - cheap. Included was a "Certificate of Destruction."

I am appealing to all businesses. Here is an opportunity to save money and, moreover, help disabled people who are trying to help themselves.

MIKE CORRADETTI

Brigantine

Don't make it harder

for addicts to get help

There are some elected officials who want the John Brooks Recovery Center gone from Atlantic City. As a recovering drug addict, this really alarms me. Closing or moving the Brooks center might make it harder for those who have had it with addiction to take that first step to get clean. I went to a rehab in North Jersey, and the locals aren't trying to get rid of it up there. It took six days of terrible withdrawal to get the opiates out of my system and another three weeks to do the rehab. All of it was worth it.

People claim that the Brooks center causes trouble in the neighborhood. Most of us recovering addicts are trying hard to stay out of trouble. What about getting more police out on the street to make the neighborhood safer? Maybe more people who want to get clean and sober would come to the rehab if they knew the neighborhood was safe.

Drug and alcohol programs need to be supported because they work. No one asks to be an addict. Please make sure that help stays accessible for those who need it.

KIM K. KELLY

Pleasantville

Honors student right

on required state tests

I agree whole-heartedly with the March 15 letter, "Honors students shouldn't have to take state test." As a teacher and the mother of honor/Advanced Placement students, it is remarkable to me that our standardized testing practices are not keeping up with the other changes demanded of our educational system.

Teachers are expected to make their instructional time both purposeful and relevant. Shouldn't our standardized testing and assessment procedures have the same expectation?

The strategies proposed by the letter writer would certainly provide the data sought through testing and, at the same time, ensure that precious weeks are not wasted for our high-school juniors and seniors. The same data could be obtained through innovative practices, rather than archaic habits. New federal Common Core Standards are now guiding planning and instruction. It's time to carry the same kind of common-sense solution to standardized testing.

KAREN EBERT

Egg Harbor Township

Natural gas also fuels

global warming, sea rise

Regarding the March 17 story, "Natural gas is top option for lower energy costs":

Natural gas is also a major cause of sea-level rise due to global warming and a cause of widespread water pollution in the nearby parts of our country where natural gas is "fracked" from underground shales by explosive injection of massive amounts of toxic-chemical-laced water.

The sea-level rise that will submerge southern New Jersey is analogous to the story of the big bad wolf and the three pigs.

The first pig cut all the trees for firewood and was the first to be swept away by a rising sea level as carbon dioxide emissions warmed the planet enough to melt the polar icecaps.

The second pig heated her or his house with natural gas and survived longer than the first pig, but was eventually swept away.

The third pig installed solar panels and lobbied for offshore wind turbines and community solar farms. He or she was fortunate that there were enough other prudent pigs, worldwide, for the atmospheric carbon-dioxide level to be returned to below 350 parts per million, keeping global warming below 2 degrees Celsius and saving coastal cities, squabbling politicians and writers of letters to the editor.

DICK COLBY

Egg Harbor City

Dick Colby is a professor emeritus of cell biology at Richard Stockton College.