Why did prosecutor

pursue Costino case?

Regarding the Nov. 9 story, "Physician acquitted in fraud, drug case":

I was glad to see that Dr. John Costino of North Wildwood was acquitted in his drug fraud case. Unfortunately, this man now has to pick up the pieces of his life and career ruined by an incompetent five-year sting and entrapment operation conducted by the morons in the Cape May County Prosecutor's Office.

These law-enforcement misfits spent five years and who knows how many tax dollars pursuing a decent and caring physician only to have a jury of his peers acquit him in under two hours. You have to wonder where the oversight was in this case. You would think that somewhere in those five years the chief county prosecutor would have said there's not enough evidence here to go forward, so let's drop the case.

Sure seems to me that someone in that office had an ax to grind.

DR. DAVID KALTER

Linwood

Shame on Sandy looter

who stole boy's Nintendo

My friend, who has terminal cancer, was evacuated from her Somers Point apartment during Hurricane Sandy. Her 9-year-old grandson's Nintendo DSi and collection of games were at her home. To whoever had the audacity to go into her home during the flooding and steal a young boy's gaming console and games - shame on you!

He has a developmental disorder and took great joy in gaming. A police report was filed but hope of getting these items back is low. I find it very sad that not only did this disastrous hurricane flood my friend's apartment, but that someone took advantage of a dire situation and stole from a child.

LEAH DROBEL

Egg Harbor Township

Thanks to everyone

bringing back O.C.

In the history of the National Weather Service, Sandy probably ranks as the kind of storm that occurs once every 150 years. We indeed are one of the more fortunate cities, yet we still had devastation all around with the massive water and sand buildup.

Let me take this opportunity to thank all the Ocean City departments and also all the contractors who have done a yeoman's job in bringing order to chaos in our city. Every worker deserves praise and a thank you for a job well done.

I know the work is tiring, but keep up the good effort, and we will soon be back close to normal.

LOUIS C. RIPA

Ocean City

N.J. should follow

other states on pot

It is very encouraging to learn that Colorado and Washington legalized marijuana for all adults in voter referendums on Nov. 6. Recreational marijuana will now be controlled, taxed and regulated by those states in a way similar to alcohol. Legitimate businesses will be licensed to sell marijuana.

New Jersey arrests approximately 25,000 people per year for marijuana offenses and has a 10 percent unemployment rate. It is time that New Jersey legalizes marijuana altogether to create jobs, reduce crime and lower taxes.

Marijuana is objectively less harmful than alcohol. It is not addictive, and no one has ever died from it. It is irrational to punish adults for using a substance safer than alcohol.

Just like alcohol prohibition, the prohibition of marijuana has not stopped its usage. All prohibition has done is move the profits of marijuana production and sale into underground markets and unfairly brand otherwise law-abiding adults with criminal records, limiting access to employment and education.

Marijuana legalization will create jobs, lower taxes and reduce crime. New Jersey, follow the lead of Colorado and Washington by taxing and regulating marijuana for adults, like alcohol.

ERIC HAFNER

Toms River

Use of first name

better than 'honey'

Regarding the Nov. 9 letters objecting to doctors who address patients by their first names:

It is inappropriate with a new patient or one who is seen by the doctor only rarely. But for a regular patient, I don't see it as a problem if the doctor and the patient have developed a comfortable relationship. I'm on a first-name basis with my primary physician's entire staff.

It seems common practice to call patients from the waiting room by first name. Maybe it's safer than trying to pronounce some difficult last names. (You'd be surprised what some people can do even to the name Myers.)

What I do object to is office or nursing staff referring to my wife and me as "honey" or "sweetheart," as happened very recently at an outpatient surgical center. It's condescending, especially to the elderly like us, and just downright rude. If it's an attempt at being friendly or making us feel comfortable, it doesn't work for us. What happened to "ma'am" or "sir" in such situations?

Another personal objection is restaurant servers who address my wife and me inappropriately as "you guys." I'm inclined to cease patronizing such establishments but that would leave us with few dining-out choices. Were I the owner or manager of any restaurant whose servers addressed diners that way I would fire them immediately.

One last gripe: Men who eat with their baseball caps on. It doesn't speak well for their upbringing and reflects their disregard for basic manners. Unfortunately, it's common practice in today's society.

CHARLES MYERS

Ventnor

Let's get to work

burying power lines

President John F. Kennedy had a vision of landing a man on the moon by the end of the 1960s, and we did it. Here's another idea for a similar, but more down-to-earth project that could help solve the nationwide unemployment problem and eliminate once and for all the power outages we've seen with Hurricane Sandy and other natural disasters.

Let's set a goal of putting all power lines underground by the end of this decade. Imagine the jobs this would create nationwide. Imagine not having to worry about heavy wet snows or falling trees bringing down power lines and plunging us into total darkness.

The cost of the project would be offset to some degree by taxes from the increased work force and a modest surcharge for all on our electric bills. I know I'd be willing to ante up for this cause. Would you?

FRANK CARROLL

West Wildwood