Stunning allegations have surfaced accusing Republican Gov. Chris Christie's administration of withholding Hurricane Sandy aid targeted for Hoboken. This town of 50,000 people and only two square miles is the fourth most densely populated town in the state, and a good part, if not all, of the city was flooded during Hurricane Sandy.

In 2005, Hurricane Katrina resulted in extensive damage to the city of New Orleans. Afterward, it seemed there was plenty of blame to go around, beginning at the White House level, but it wasn't until former Mayor Ray Nagin wrote a book, "Katrina's Secrets," detailing his experiences at the height of the storm, that the truth finally surfaced. The book reveals similarities to what is playing out now, post Sandy, in New Jersey.

Before Katrina, there were two candidates running for governor of Louisiana - Democrat Kathleen Blanco and Republican Bobby Jindal.

Nagin, a Democratic, wrote a letter to each candidate asking what they intended to do for his city. Impressed by Jindal's reply, he threw his support behind the Republican. Hearing this, Blanco, who was elected, told Nagin: "There will be hell to pay for you in the future." As a result, New Orleans was left to fend for itself.

Politicians on both sides sometimes are forgetful of just what is expected of them and whom they are supposed to serve. In New Jersey, we continue to see reports that almost one-third of Sandy relief funds have gone to unaffected areas.

The bottom line is simple. Following a disaster, not one community in this or any other state should be waiting as long as some in New Jersey have for the necessary and approved funds that were promised.

JIM EBERWINE

Absecon