As I watched the "friends," celebrities, agents and others in the "in" crowd attending Philip Seymour Hoffman's funeral, I thought to myself: Where were they?

Where were they, given his history of addictive behavior, when he was beyond his usual disheveled self, when he was at an airport intoxicated, when he was seen at an Atlanta bar?

Did they fear they might lose his favor?

Hoffman, in the throes of addiction, needed to count on good friends.

I would have been waiting outside his apartment with one handcuff bracelet on my wrist waiting to attach the other end on him and take him to rehab.

But like Michael Jackson and Anna Nicole Smith, he was surrounded by enablers, those who dared not lose his affection or their hook to celebrity.

In an old episode of "MASH," Hawkeye turned in a 16-year-old trying to pass for 18 so he could stay in the Army.

The young man responded, "I will hate you forever" - to which Hawkeye replied, "Let it be a long and happy hate."

It's a shame Hoffman's "friends" didn't feel the same way.