N.J. must invest

in wind power

Regarding the March 22 story, "Board of Public Utilities decision means N.J. left behind on wind energy":

One man's political ambitions should not stand in the way of clean, renewable energy. Offshore wind turbines would provide reliable, renewable electricity, far from the field of view of people who might complain about their appearance.

Offshore wind should be considered an investment that will pay for itself over time. Were wind energy to be subsidized in the same manner that gas and coal are, the playing field would be leveled.

It is time for the BPU to broaden its narrow view of alternative energy sources. It is time for politicians to stop being cowed by political ambitions. It is time for New Jersey to take the lead and invest in a reliable, clean, renewable source of power.

LAURA LYNCH

Lawrence Township

Lacey solar project

wasted taxpayer money

In March, New Jersey's comptroller issued an alert about an investigation into the $19.8 million solar project by the Lacey Township School District. This was superfluous spending at its best.

The alert says the school district failed to protect taxpayers. (It does not name Lacey, but it gives enough information to know which project is being discussed.)

An architectural firm's inexperience with solar projects caused a significant overestimate, resulting in overbonding for the project of $8.2 million. This in turn caused the unnecessary expenditure of $4 million in state money since the DOE subsidized the project.

The taxpayers ultimately are bearing the responsibility of overbonding at a cost of $3.5 million in additional interest. This is a significant sum.

When members of the public questioned this project, we were ridiculed. No prudent manager of public funds would have allowed this to happen.

The board members and administrators who approved this project should immediately resign for dereliction of duty.

REGINA DISCENZA

Lacey Township

EMT group ready

to help with Narcan

With reports daily about New Jersey's heroin epidemic and increasing overdose deaths, we commend Gov. Chris Christie for signing the waiver to allow emergency medical technicians to administer Narcan to help reverse the potentially fatal effects of opioid intoxication.

If not fatal, an opioid overdose can cause devastating brain injury. In essence, "time is brain." Because EMTs who provide basic life support often are first to reach patients, it makes sense to equip them with such a lifesaving tool.

We stand ready to work with the governor, his staff and Health Commissioner Mary O'Dowd in developing training and implementation guidelines for this new policy. With such a tremendous need for early intervention during the heroin crisis, we can't afford to wait.

HOWARD MEYER

Summit

Howard Meyer is president of the 85-year-old nonprofit New Jersey State First Aid Council.

Governor obligated

to fund pensions

Regarding the March 30 editorial, "Christie and pensions/Devious move":

Gov. Chris Christie unilaterally changed the state formula for funding public-worker pensions, reducing this year's payment from $2.4 billion to $2.25 billion.

The 2011 reforms, which eliminated cost-of-living increases for pension recipients and forced workers to pay more toward their pensions, also required the state to make increasing payments over seven years.

The governor's move is fiscally unsound and deepens the hole the system is in. In my opinion, this important information should have been on the front page of your newspaper, not on the editorial page.

BETTY CANDERAN

Cape May Court House

Imagine the children

stuck on that bridge

Regarding the scandal over the deliberate closing of lanes on the George Washington Bridge:

Disregard everything except that there were little children stuck in traffic on school buses on the first day of school and that they were very frightened because of the situation. That fact alone should be enough to toss Gov. Chris Christie in the water under the jammed bridge. Those little ones are God's little miracles.

All the details that the governor says he was unaware of should show people where his attention is. He isn't thinking about New Jersey's citizens. He is thinking about Washington and the White House.

DORIS VOGT

Ocean City