Let the buyer beware

on electricity prices

Regarding the Aug. 8 letter, "Third-party supplier overprices electricity":

I have had a similar experience, which clearly indicates that "bait and switch" procedures are definitely being employed.

On my July bill, the largest of the year, I was charged 14 cents per kilowatt-hour by my "lower cost" supplier, while Atlantic City Electric Co.'s rate was only 9.05 cents, a difference of $87 for that month's use.

The third-party supplier's answer was that "rates can change from day to day" and that the word "introductory" was included in the original offer. In short, the company is doing nothing illegal. Although when I demanded that I be immediately switched back to ACE, the company informed me that such a change could take up to three billing cycles, while the Board of Public Utilities advised me that it should take two months at most.

After requesting a change back, a representative of the supplier had the gall to call and offer me another "introductory" rate of 8-plus cents per killowatt-hour if I were to rescind my cancellation.

Clearly, this is a situation of "let the buyer beware" that should be brought to the attention of the public, especially to senior citizens like me who are already struggling to keep our expenses down.


Galloway Township

Less pollution

isn't good enough?

For decades, environmentalists have been whining about the air pollution from the coal-fired generators at the B.L. England power plant in Beesleys Point. Now that the plant's conversion to natural gas will make a huge reduction in pollution, that's not good enough for them.

They want solar power or wind turbines, but no one comes up with any numbers that compare green energy with the kilowatts provided by natural gas. The federal government has already wasted $500 million subsidizing solar energy. All the wind-power companies also must rely on government money. It's time for environmentalists to put their own money where their mouths are.


Galloway Township

How can right oppose

better health care?

I am in awe watching the right wing fight to deny 30 million to 45 million of their friends and neighbors an opportunity to have better lives by having health insurance.

If people would think it through, they would not follow the mindless rhetoric from the right wing, which is willing to shut down our government, with all the pain and suffering this would entail, to block the implementation of the Affordable Care Act. The right wing will stop at nothing in its obsession to embarrass our president. Who in the world is against having health-insurance protection for our families?



Child-obesity fight

is working in N.J.

Recently, the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention reported signs of significant progress in reversing the childhood-obesity epidemic. Between 2008 and 2011, 18 states showed decreases in obesity rates for low-income preschoolers. Among these states, New Jersey recorded the second-largest decrease.

These are the children whose families have had the most limited chances to make healthy choices. New Jersey's results are a testament to all the work being done by local groups like ours and the Cumberland Cape Atlantic YMCA and national organizations like the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Since 2009, the New Jersey Partnership for Healthy Kids has spearheaded efforts to build and strengthen childhood-obesity prevention strategies that support access to affordable healthy foods and increase opportunities for safe physical activity in Camden, Newark, New Brunswick, Trenton and Vineland.

But there's still much left to do. If this report shows us anything, it's that the communities and states that are making robust changes can achieve success in reversing the childhood obesity epidemic.

We will succeed only if all sectors -our schools, our communities, our businesses, our workplaces, our grocery stores, etc. - work to help children and families make healthy choices where they live, learn, work and play.


Program Manager

New Jersey Partnership

for Healthy Kids