Banning guns

isn't the answer

Here we go again: Ban guns.

Folks, we need no more gun laws. What we need is for the courts to enforce fully the laws in place now, not more bleeding hearts.

I oppose there are those who think they need an AK47 or an M16 in their gun collection. I have my shotguns, rifles and even a pistol for sport shooting. After 22 years in the military and many firearms classes and schools, I would like to see laws in place requiring you to show proof of training in your firearm of choice. A purchase permit should not be issued by any police department until the proof is shown in writing.

The United States should also remember what Adolf Hitler did after his gun control act went into effect.

JIM SIMMONS

Egg Harbor Township

Stop allowing NRA

to dictate policy

Am I surprised at what happened in Newtown, Conn.? No.

But I am angry - at the National Rifle Association and all those who support allowing anyone and everyone to own any number and type of guns they want.

And I am disgusted at our elected leaders who will say they are going to do something about it and never do.

I am ashamed to say I live in a country where the ones who demand the right to carry arms for their protection end up causing numerous deaths of innocent people because of their rights. My right to live in this country without fear of something like this happening means nothing.

As emotional as Barack Obama was, he should have been more angry and said what everyone feels, unless they are an NRA supporter. The words I have to say to those people could not be printed.

Every legislator who backs the NRA and what it stands for should be voted out of office and replaced with those who care about the rights of human beings and who will change the laws.

As usual we will debate it, analyze it, talk about it. And in the end, nothing will change. Sadly, we allow a segment in our country to dictate what they feel is best, yet time and time again, we see the horrors of allowing these types of weapons to be owned.

DAVID WESSEL

Galloway Township

Lawmakers fear NRA

more than mass murder

Twenty little children are dead. How many more innocent victims will have to die?

In 1990, Gov. Jim Florio pushed the strictest gun control law in the nation through the N.J. Legislature. He later vetoed amendments pushed by the National Rifle Association weakening the law, and his veto was unanimously upheld, despite the NRA spending more than $1 million to gut the law. The NRA then spent even more money to defeat Florio in his re-election bid.

What will the NRA say to the parents of the slaughtered children and the spouses of the murdered adults? That if every teacher and student were armed, the massacre would not have happened?

Where is the Jim Florio of 2012? As the Connecticut tragedy shows, consequences will continue to be deadly when no one in a position to change the laws listens.

Members of Congress in both political parties allowed the federal assault weapons ban to expire. Their absolute cowardice is loathsome.

The heinous slaughter in Connecticut should prompt all lawmakers to ask themselves what scares them more: the power of the National Rifle Association to affect their political campaigns or children's blood-soaked bodies on a classroom floor?

HELEN E. FITZSIMMONS

Beachwood

A sad commentary

on America today

The tragedy that occurred at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., reveals again that this country is immersed in a culture of evil and violence.

It rears its ugly head on television shows and movies and in video games. There is no way to escape it.

Now there will be more talk about stricter gun-control laws. This happened after the mass murders at Columbine High School and Virginia Tech. But stricter gun-control laws will not stop evil people from carrying out their acts of violence against society.

Every school must take every possible precaution to protect their students and staff. It may mean that an armed security guard should be stationed at the entrance.

This is a sad commentary on what has happened in our society today.

DAVID M. LEVIN

Vineland