Watch ice melt in a glass

and relax about climate

Allow me to explain to your readers the geological and climatological history of southern New Jersey.

In a nutshell, approximately 16,000 years ago during the peak of the last ice age, you would have had to drive about 70 miles east of Atlantic City to dip your toe in the ocean. Manhattan had about 5,000 to 8,000 feet of ice, and all of southern New Jersey was an inhospitable Arctic desert.

Conversely, during the thermal maximum period 8,000-3,500 years ago, the Earth was ice free, and the shore line was around Trenton.

I weary of the doomsayers who are arrogant enough to think that we can control the climate like a thermostat. Alas, I await the warm breezes of summer and will study on a micro level the melting of ice in a glass of juice and rum. I invite all to join me. Perhaps we could have this research project funded by the government.


Somers Point

Stop ignoring

Iraqi victims of war

Regarding the March 20 column by Raed Jarrar, "10 years later, Iraq suffering, thanks to U.S.":

Finally, at long last, The Press of Atlantic City runs a column about the vile Iraq War from the perspective of the victims.

There is no scarcity of sympathy for members of the American military who suffered death or injury related to the horrors inflicted on a poor country that was never a threat to us. How easy it is to forget those Iraqis murdered and maimed with bullets and bombs or with hell's own minions - unmanned drones. According to, from 111,000 to 122,000 Iraqi noncombatants have been killed, 4,180 of them children. In the cold, bureaucratic term, they're "collateral damage."

If American children had been harmed, would they be called "collateral damage," too?

These Iraqi victims are ignored in the vast majority of Western commentaries on the war.


Little Egg Harbor Township

Government has duty

to help its citizens

Regarding the March 16 letter, "Getting free stuff undermines freedom":

The letter writer contends that any form of assistance from government must be earned. He complains that we all pay for the "free stuff" that some get, and he says that anyone accepting such assistance is giving up their "freedom."

Should we verify every person and every town that accepts state or federal money as they are giving up their "freedom"? Perhaps the letter writer would have checkpoints at all free roads, free libraries and free parks where everyone would have to show their W-2 statement.

The Declaration of Independence ends with "we pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor." This is no loss of freedom. The Constitution of the United States says "in order to form a more perfect union, establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense and promote the general welfare."

Freedom is also a right or privilege to give, to help and to assist those in need without verification. This is God's freedom, given to all.


Mays Landing

Show compassion

for storm victims

Regarding the March 19 letter, "Why should I pay to raise your house?":

I live in the small fishing village of Fortescue on the Delaware Bay. My neighbors consist of hardworking men and women whose livelihoods depend on the fishing industry that was decimated by Hurricane Sandy and the Dec. 21 storm and retirees like my husband who worked 40 years in the construction industry and retired here to enjoy fishing and crabbing. The homes here are far from elite ocean-view mansions.

As far as insurance covering the costs of rebuilding, the letter writer should check his facts.

Flood insurance, which is far from cheap, does not cover much of the damage we incurred. It has been more than four months since the hurricane, and some of my neighbors still have not been compensated by their insurance companies. People have paid insurance premiums for 20 to 30 years and never had a claim. Now they are being told, "Sorry, we don't cover that."

My neighbors and I pay the same taxes as the letter writer does. I would much rather see those taxes used to help the hurricane victims than be sent to Egypt or to pay the fools in Washington who refuse to work together to help the people they are paid to serve.

Finally, instead of calling people stupid, how about showing some compassion for people who were hurt by an act of nature they had no control over?