Boys & Girls Club

relies on donations

Regarding the Feb. 18 editorial, "Atlantic City Boys & Girls Club/

Funds needed":

We appreciated The Press' support of the Atlantic City Boys & Girls Club in the midst of our current financial crisis and your recognition that the club is invaluable because of its educational, recreational, arts, sports, mentoring and life-skill programs.

Club personnel transport children 5 to 18 years old who arrive on school days at 3 p.m. and may stay as late as 9 p.m. The club is a safe place where they are fed, kept warm, educated and entertained. We provide hope and safety to more than 230 children daily.

Please visit our website - - to see our kids' accomplishments despite their obstacles, including those who have graduated from prestigious colleges when no one in their families had ever before graduated high school.

We also appreciate the support of those who attended our "Men R' Cookin'" event. But neither this event nor the upcoming annual "Golf Fore Kids" tournament sustains the club. The club has survived largely on government grants; however, the availability of this funding has decreased in recent years.

This forced us to close our satellite Chelsea club to cut costs so the main club on Pennsylvania Avenue would survive. When we did so, we learned that many members of the community believed the club was funded by the city. This is not true. The club is a self-sustaining charitable organization that is reliant on the generosity of our benefactors.

Given these circumstances, the club will only continue to survive through contributions from our community. So to be perfectly blunt, in addition to attending our fun events, if you wish to sustain our mission, it is critical that you write us a check now and hopefully commit to doing so annually .

This is our new reality. As an organization, we are taking decisive steps to adapt to that new reality. To support us, please call 609-347-2697. Thank you.


Chief Professional Officer


Board Chairwoman

Boys & Girls Club

Atlantic City

Why does A.C. land

sit undeveloped?

Like so many others in Atlantic City, my family and I were forced out of our homes and businesses in the mid-1960s for a massive urban-renewal plan that only resulted in a huge prairie for many, many years.

When one views the 38 beach blocks from the Inlet to Albany Avenue, it appears that urban renewal in some way has reared its ugly head again. Many of those beach blocks have no structures on them or structures that are vacant and boarded up.

This is supposed to be prime land on a popular resort island. One wonders what happened and whether any nongaming ventures or residential projects are being actively pursued to end the blight.

I have lived and worked in Atlantic City and Ventnor for 60 years, and it is incredibly depressing to see what has happened to this once-vibrant city.



Some state troopers

lack professionalism

While driving through New Gretna in Burlington County recently, I was stopped for speeding. I was having unexpected vision problems due to eye surgery three weeks ago, and I could not accurately read the speed limit sign. I was headed to Atlantic City International Airport to catch the next fight home to Fort Myers, Fla., to see my eye surgeon.

Because it was a Sunday, there was no one available in New Jersey who could have helped me. I could see well enough to drive.

I tried to explain my problem to the State Police corporal who stopped me, but he only started to raise his voice at me angrily. I took the verbal abuse and the ticket just to get away from this officer.

The State Police should start to evaluate its force for unprofessional troopers, such as the one who had no time to listen to me, and provide better training. I probably would have gotten a ticket anyway, but I would not have been as upset by his treatment of me.

This training would help to produce a first-class police force that would care about the safety and well-being of its citizens.


Fort Myers, Fla.

People living in motels

can get library cards

Regarding the Feb. 20 letter, "Library policy unfair to motel residents":

The Atlantic County Library System is committed to serving all residents. The letter writer suggested that our libraries do not issue library cards to people living in motels. That is not the case.

Patrons who visit any of the county library system's 10 branches, bookmobile or reading center have access to all resources, including computers, for free without a library card. A library card is required, however, to borrow materials.

To obtain a free county library card, residents must provide proof of residency. Children younger than 13 must also have parental permission.

If someone cannot provide proof of county residency, the library system will mail a form to verify the address. Upon return of that form, a card can be issued.

Without proof of residency, a temporary card may be purchased for $10 with valid identification for use for up to four months.

The Atlantic County Library System welcomes all residents and visitors. Locations and hours are available at, or call us at 609-625-2776.



Atlantic County Library System

Mays Landing

Don't let Democrats

restrict gun rights

It's a fresh, new two-year term for the Democratic majorities in the New Jersey Senate and Assembly, and here is what's coming your way, fellow citizens:

Assemblyman Louis Greenwald, D-Burlington, Camden, and Senate President Steven Sweeney, D-Salem, Gloucester, have sponsored bills to strip your ability as an ordinary citizen to adequately protect yourself, your family and your property.

These bills would reduce the current legal firearm magazine capacity in New Jersey from 15 rounds to 10 rounds. This legislation, if it becomes law, would make firearms that people may have had for years potentially illegal to possess. This is what these anti-gun Democrats would love to see happen: take your capability away because they feel that you are irresponsible and that government knows best.

We must ask ourselves why we keep placing these kinds of people in office, people who continue to diminish our personal freedoms for the alleged "safety" of the public.

It is a proven fact that when we can't protect ourselves, criminals or opportunists will take the advantage. Just look at the crime statistics in Camden, Chicago and Washington.

What's next? The time is now to stand up and make your voice heard - before we can't do that any longer either.



New Jersey should ban

smoking in casinos

Regarding the Feb. 21 story, " N.J. beach smoking ban proposed":

No beach smoking. What a great headline. Fresh air, it's awesome.

How in our right minds can we still allow indoor smoking in our casinos? Referring to the beach smoking ban, one legislator said, "We're all better off if we get this done."

The fact that New Jersey allows smoking in casinos is a crime. Officials know that secondhand smoke is detrimental to everyone's health, even those sitting on a beach.

I work in a casino and have lumps in my chest. The doctor told me to stop smoking. I said I never smoked in my life. He then said, "You must work in a casino. Change jobs."

That's what arrogant smokers tell me. That's easy for them to say. Why should I have to change jobs to protect my health? Let them go outside to smoke as they have to do in any other restaurant, bar or public space. They say gambling and smoking go together. So do crack and heroin. They are all addictions.

I know the casinos don't care about their employees, but how about the government? Our officials don't care about the taxpayers' rights. Think of the money that could be saved by cutting health care costs and keeping people alive.

Make it a national law, and that's it. Level the playing field in all states.

I encourage everyone to email our local officials. Smoking in casinos must be stopped.


Brick Township