Criminals don't worry

about firearm laws

I can now sleep easy. What a relief that state leaders are putting in place more laws in regard to the right to bear arms. Now, let's see the bad guys get a gun.

We should see a major drop in homicides, thanks to tougher requirements imposed upon the citizens of New Jersey. Our state has the toughest gun laws. Generally, only law enforcement officers can carry a concealed weapon. Please explain how the bad guys carry guns.

Trenton can spend each month establishing new gun laws, and the murder rate will continue to rise or at best level off. New Jersey, like Cuba, would rather all citizens have no weapons of any kind. People say, if you don't like it here, leave. Well, I plan to, but don't forget. New Jersey has a real estate exit tax, so you'll have to pay a fee to leave. Let's call it giving Castro his cut of your money.



Oppressive governments

try to disarm citizens

While watching the film "Schindler's List," I was struck by how one of the most advanced cultures of Europe could degenerate into barbarism under a too-powerful government that first disarmed and then cowed people into submission.

This same pattern could be seen in the killing fields of Cambodia, the slaughter under Idi Amin in Uganda and still today in various African and Asian nations. A government gains power with benevolent promises and proceeds to disarm the citizenry while vilifying a segment of the populous.

We say it can't happen here. Why not? We are not as highly cultured as Germany was before the Nazi takeover. Many say that it has already happened here. Think of Wounded Knee and the slaughter by the U.S. Cavalry of disarmed Native American women and children. Think of the disarmament, internment and mistreatment of Americans of Japanese descent during World War II. I fear we are on that downward path to barbarism after many years of failure by our education system to teach the lessons of American exceptionalism.

The Second Amendment was intended to ensure self-protection and maintain a check on the inclination of government to become oppressive. We must think long and hard before allowing the loss of more constitutional rights.


Egg Harbor Township

Obama, Democrats accept

donations from the rich

Recently President Barack Obama claimed the Republican Party was bonded together in the common desire to protect the rich. Unless he counts thousands of small businesses as the rich, he knows this is not true. It is a tired cliche that people with intelligence can see through.

Who are these rich whom the GOP are so eager to help? Big corporations that gained from the stimulus that Obama supported? It certainly can't be Newsweb Corp., which, through political action committees, gave $3.57 million to Obama's campaign, or Renaissance Technologies,which gave $3.5 million to it. How about Jeffrey Katzenberg, CEO of DreamWorks Animation in Hollywood, who gave $3.07 million to the Obama campaign? Is the president or the Democratic Party bonded to any of them? Maybe bonded is the wrong word; how about beholden to them?

As for the state of our union, we still have 8 percent unemployment and gas prices approaching $4 a gallon. Now, what's the good news?


Somers Point

Football teaches players

to confront adversity

President Barack Obama recently said that if he had sons, they would not play football. Many parents concur. Injuries are part of the sport, which I never played. I did serve as cheerleader, waterboy and statistician (too fragile and cowardly to don a helmet).

My daughter and her husband, an NFL executive, have two teenage sons who play high school football, with realistic aspirations to go further. What better activity is out there for young men to learn about confronting adversity?

Parents have done a good job keeping adversity at arm's length, maybe too good a job. In my era, we didn't need football to teach us how to handle tough times. Adversity was a daily visitor.

Concerned parents must factor in the strong prospect of injury - sprains, fractures and concussions - before allowing a son to step onto the gridiron.

I watched my eldest grandson handle the adversity several injuries dealt him. His pop-pop would have immediately turned to bocce, synchronized swimming, ping-pong or ultimate Frisbee if I had sustained such bodily insults.

He went through the surgeries and rigorous rehab required. At an early age, he connected with the well-spring of inner resolve he can tap when unexpected tough times come his way.

Football isn't for everyone. But nothing keeps my wife and me from a Friday night game, home or on the road, under the heavy 49ers blanket warming my bony arthritic knees. I pray that my grandkids, their teammates and opponents don't get hurt. I trust their coaches, their trainers, the referees and the equipment makers to do their part to keep the boys safe. I hope that football has taught them that in life all too often we have to play hurt.


Diamond Beach