Show us the news,

•ot reporters' faces

During the critical event of Hurricane Sandy, I became extremely exasperated at the continued insistence of broadcasters to feature the reporters' faces rather than the events being broadcast.

We already know who the reporters are. We are watching to learn about the event. So get the reporters' faces off the screens and concentrate on what is actually happening at the moment of the broadcast. Let's report the event, not popularize the reporter.

SHERMAN MILLER

Sea Isle City

Limit rebuilding

on barrier islands

My civic prayer is that we as a community heed Hurricane Sandy's devastation and use it to improve our environment.

Allow the coastline to act as an effective natural barrier. Reconstruct an effective coastal dune system. Prohibit all reconstruction that does not serve this agenda.

Our governmental leaders would best serve the community by having the courage to lead responsibly. Take this circumstance as an opportunity to understand that beach replenishment is futile and irresponsible when the real problem - overdevelopment on the barrier islands - is not addressed.

We need to face a very apparent reality. Communities cannot be sustained on barrier islands with such wanton disrespect of the environment.

Please be tough. Make courageous decisions. The safety and economic welfare of your citizens requires difficult, compassionate leadership.

ANN E. LUNETTA

Belleplain

We are Jersey strong

- and we'll be back

How are you? "Not good" is the only answer that fits after Superstorm Sandy. Grown men are tearing up for what they have lost. Mothers, friends, children, cousins, aunts and uncles are without homes, food or heat.

Children don't understand. They think a superhero is going to save them. But my superheroes are right here. They are the men and women volunteering to help clean up, the strangers driving down streets asking to help, the Coast Guard and first-responders saving lives, the firefighters, police officers and electricians working around the clock, and the restaurant owners giving out free food and a place to charge your phone.

We need to thank these people and their families. While their homes are destroyed, their power out, or their car is flooded, they are away from home keeping order and restoring peace.

Sandy ripped away memories and took them to sea with the tide, changing our coastline forever. I learned to surf in Ventnor and to row in Brigantine. I spent eight summers walking the beaches in Ocean City as a beach tagger or walking on the north end of Brigantine beach in the snow in the dead of winter for peace and quiet. We cannot rebuild all that Sandy stole from us. Those memories, homes, and other places are gone.

But the people and their communities remain. We are the real New Jersey - not MTV's "Jersey Shore" or "Jerseylicious." The sons and daughters of teachers, cops, electricians and casino workers are what remains. We will start over. We will build better homes and have stronger memories. We will stand together, and we will be victorious because we are New Jersey. We are Jersey strong.

PATRICE GIRARD

Northfield

Parking at The Wave

appreciated in storm

I want to express my appreciation for all of the hard work the emergency personnel did on Absecon Island during the catastrophe called Sandy, and my heart goes out to the many who are still suffering the effects of the devastation.

My family was among the more fortunate evacuees who took advantage of The Wave parking garage's generous offer to park our car for free while we rode out the storm with gracious friends who opened their hearts and their Egg Harbor Township home to my husband and me, his 92-year-old mother and our two cats.

The Casino Reinvestment Development Authority, which built The Wave garage, is to be highly commended for its generosity toward residents, as are the many people like our friends offshore who provided shelter for so many island dwellers.

REBECCA HARLAN

Ventnor

IDs to get home,

but not to vote?

To get back onto the barrier islands after Sandy, you needed to wait in long lines in your car to show identification. Did any of these people not have IDs to get home? Why is it not an issue to show an ID to get to your home, but it is an issue to show an ID to vote?

You need IDs to travel on airlines, to do your banking, to pick up your children at preschool. Teachers have to wear their IDs around their necks at school. Students have school IDs. Casino workers have IDs. I find it quite odd that in this day and age of high security that there are so many people who would complain about showing IDs to vote.

KATHI TETLEY

Northfield