Christie and Obama

deserve our praise

I had to write a letter to thank all the people who worked so hard to help the people of New Jersey, starting with President Barack Obama for signing the disaster declaration so soon and our very own Gov. Chris Christie, who was the leader we knew he was. I'm so proud of him.

To those who criticized Christie for embracing the president when they were working together to help the people of New Jersey, I say that's just sour grapes. This is the way government is supposed to work - together. This is our nation. Wake up or get out.

And thank you again to all the linemen, our own and the ones from all over the country, who worked marvels restoring our power.


Galloway Township

Sandy shows us

man is not in charge

Man can build skyscrapers and bridges, go to the moon, and predict the weather - but he can't do a thing to stop us from getting the brunt of bad weather.

Rich or poor, if you're in the weather path, you will get hit the same. Why? Because there is a higher being. All religions call God by different names, but we know humans are not in charge. As the old saying goes, "I don't know what the future holds, but I know who holds the future."


Atlantic City

Weymouth mishandled

storm communication

I was not so proud of how Weymouth Township reported Hurricane Sandy evacuation possibilities to its residents. Leadership by the mayor and council was lacking.

I live in a 55-plus community, and we were all left totally in the dark about what we should do about evacuating our homes, if needed. It was quite unsettling. Not one person came through our community to tell us what we should do. Fortunately, we did have electricity, which allowed us to listen to radio and TV. It would have been nice if our local public access TV channel had broadcast more information about our area and the storm instead of all the insignificant information programmed on a daily basis. This channel is a very important news resource, and it was not used in a manner it should have been during this most critical time. We should have heard from our mayor and emergency management people.


Mays Landing

How sad for us

that Romney lost

I had almost inexpressible emotions after the presidential election. I must have looked exhausted because my mom asked, "What happened?"

With tears in my eyes I thought about Mitt Romney's concession speech. I recalled how he said that the second best decision he ever made was to select Paul Ryan as his running mate (his wife was the first). And I bid farewell to two God-loving, tender and courageous men.

As I cry I think of the children who call our president their hero, foreseeing the pain they will be in when marriage becomes only a choice involving any two people, and sacredness is trampled under foot. I see the dismantling of the once sought-after goal of having a traditional family. I see the name of Jesus stricken from their vocabulary as they seek sense in their empty world.

There will be more tears and difficult trials. But no matter how they try to silence us, another will speak up. In this journey, do not ever despair. Remember Saint Paul's description of some very awesome gifts for us to Timothy: "For God does not give us the spirit of fear but of power and love and a sound mind."


Galloway Township

Change Senate rule

on breaking filibusters

On Nov. 4, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid appeared on "60 Minutes" with Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, and when Reid was asked what was the cause of the gridlock in the Senate, he was succinct: "The Republican Senate used 248 filibusters during Obama's first term."

McConnell's reply to the same question was that the American people want reduced spending, and his use of the filibuster, which requires a supermajority of 60 votes to break, is justified to prevent spending by the government.

There are two opposite economic policies in the Senate. Democrats follow the policy of John Maynard Keynes, who believed the government must spend its way out of economic recessions, and Republicans adhere to the philosophy of Friederich Hayek, who believed government should do nothing but wait for economic change, which will come when business feels confident.

The gridlock could be reduced by lowering the number of votes needed to break a filibuster or even getting rid of the filibuster altogether. Reid has said that he will attempt a Senate rule change on filibusters in 2013.


Ocean City