Sandy and Christie

undermined Romney

Mitt Romney was on a roll until Hurricane Sandy and Gov. Chris Christie took the wind out of his sails. Our entire nation, and probably our entire world, will now suffer the consequences of Sandy for generations.

I'm afraid our great nation will not survive the give-me-more-stuff mentality that re-elected Barack Obama unless something changes drastically. Let's hope and pray that he comes to his senses and realizes what he has done for the last four years isn't working.

Can we survive four more years of redistribution, Obamacare, Obama cars, a sluggish economy and huge deficits? Hopefully, we can. Realistically, we can't - at least not as the vibrant nation we once were.

ETTORE CATTANEO

Cape May

Criminals stayed in A.C.

and vandalized houses

On Oct. 29 during the height of the storm, our house in Atlantic City was vandalized. It was one of a number of homes that were broken into by a marauding group of vandals who remained in the city and didn't evacuate because Mayor Lorenzo Langford made it easy for them to ignore Gov. Chris Christie's evacuation order. Certainly, all the hoodies stayed, and they had free rein to all the empty houses.

Our house was broken into at 6:15 p.m. at the height of the storm. Our security alarm went off when the rear door was smashed in. The police records indicate that the security company called and reported the break-in. However, there was no police response, and the thugs had all the time needed to completely ravage the house. There were mud tracks on every floor. Every drawer was emptied and the contents strewn everywhere.

Our tax bill is high. These men are paid well, and we deserve better.

MARIO J. PALLOTTA

Atlantic City

Thanks to everyone

who helped West A.C.

I would like to thank all the emergency personnel who helped out during the storm in West Atlantic City, which was especially hard hit.

First and foremost, my firefighters in the West Atlantic City Volunteer Fire Company No. 5 - you never gave up. Also, our fellow firefighters in the four other volunteer fire companies in Egg Harbor Township, EHT Fire Chief Bill Danz, the EHT Technical Rescue Team, the ladies auxiliaries, the Police Department, the emergency medical technicians, the Public Works Department and local government officials.

EHT dispatchers, we don't see your faces, but we're certainly glad to hear your voices.

I'd also like to thank the Atlantic County Sheriff's Department, the county Office of Emergency Management and the residents who brought us food and helped each other.

God bless all of you.

WALLY BAKELY

Chief

Volunteer Fire Company No. 5

West Atlantic City

Trash workers have done

an outstanding job

I would like to express my deepest respect for the trash workers who are cleaning up from the huge disaster of Hurricane Sandy.

As a public insurance adjuster who has devoted this first phase of recovery to first-responders' homes so that they can be there for the rest of us, I have noticed the wonderful devotion of the people who do the "dirty work" of removing the debris of this disaster.

They are unnoticed and uncredited, but they deserve as much attention and applause as anyone. Thank all of you who have one of the toughest jobs of all. Know we all deeply appreciate your dedicated efforts.

RICK LASCHEID

Ventnor

LBI gas customers

are losing patience

I live on Long Beach Island. Thankfully, my home was spared major damage from Hurricane Sandy. I know that others have it far worse, but I think Gov. Chris Christie needs to put pressure on New Jersey Natural Gas to do what its franchise requires and expeditiously fix its infrastructure so permanent residents can return to their homes.

I am grateful that the island has been reopened. But while I can visit my home to inspect for further damage and begin the cleanup and repair process, I can't live in a house without heat and hot water during the winter.

While I see electric utility trucks from many different states pitching in to repair the electric infrastructure, I don't see many NJNG trucks, much less gas utility trucks from other states, working to restore service.

While the electricity infrastructure is almost fully restored, NJNG says it has just finished its assessment. It's hard to believe the utility has taken almost two weeks just to study the problem. Where is the worst-case disaster plan it should have had on the shelf ready to be implemented?

It is understandable that a flood could damage gas connections to a house, but, for the most part, not the underground distribution system. If the distribution system needs replacing that suggests the system was a failure waiting to happen.

NJNG management's slowness in assessing the problem and in developing a plan to fix the problem, and their gross lack of effective communication with customers, are failures of significant magnitude. All of these are reasons for the Board of Public Utilities to take away its franchise and give it to another gas utility.

Since customers have heard zero information of value from NJNG, we have to rely on rumors. We hear the whole system may have to be replaced. We hear it may take six months. Please tell us how long this is going to take.

DENNIS DUGAN

Loveladies