Associated Press story

unfair to Seaside Park

Regarding the Sept. 14 front-page article, "Seaside fire probe starts":

The Associated Press reporter chose to say in the first two paragraphs that Seaside Park "created some raucous reality TV, like the time Snooki was laid out by a barroom sucker punch" and that it was where the governor "ate pizza (at least before his recent weight loss surgery)."

Reading this at the start of a very important and emotional article, I shook my head in wonder. Why write a sordid and sarcastic story? Do people need to know about Snooki or that the governor was eating pizza that likely added to his waist?

How about a story about the good people who are trying to stay strong after an unprecedented second disaster?

CHUCK FURIMSKY

Ocean City

Thank Christianity

for religious freedom

The writer of the Sept. 17 letter, "Promoting Christianity isn't town council's job," suggests that the Galloway Township Council was "promoting" Christian prayer or Christianity.

But these were just general religious prayers that people of all religions can participate in. And if you are an atheist, then you can sit quietly or go outside and wait. Nor are people of other faiths being "made to feel unwelcome."

It does not violate the First Amendment to have a prayer before a township meeting. It does not establish a state religion. Religious leaders are not running the government.

What many people don't realize is that this country was not founded on freedom of religion, as people say; it was founded on and by a religion - Christianity. The people who left oppression to start new lives here used Christian values and beliefs to create the rules and laws put forth in our Constitution. Now there is intolerance against Christianity in our society.

It is because of Christianity and the people who came here and used Christian values and beliefs to create our society that people of all faiths have the right to practice their religions freely.

So, I say invite people of all faiths to say a Christian prayer, and by them doing so, they will be saying thank you to Christianity and the founders of our nation, which allows them the freedoms that they have here now.

WILLIAM DINGMAN

Egg Harbor Township

All libertarians

are not the same

Regarding the Sept. 11 column by Nick Hanauer and Eric Liu, "Libertarians like Ron Paul are actually akin to communists":

I became a libertarian in 1978, and I suppose it's progress that instead of being ignored, we're misrepresented. However, saying libertarianism and communism are alike is truly a new level of chutzpah.

The authors of "The Black Book of Communism" estimate the total dead attributable to communists to be close to 100 million. The Koch brothers have murdered no one as far as I can tell.

Modern libertarianism is a philosophy with many wings. In some respects, it's unfortunate that the only people the public knows are the Ron Pauls and John Stossels.

Not all libertarians are leftists and noninterventionists in foreign policy. The followers of Ayn Rand were indistinguishable from the conservatives during the Cold War and favor a minimal state. Ron Paul's mentor, Murray Rothbard, was an anarchist and noninterventionist in foreign policy, although his mentor, the Austrian economist Ludwig Von Mises, was not an anarchist.

Modern libertarians can trace their heritage back at least to classical economists and the French economist Frederic Bastiat, who sounded like Ayn Rand in 1850.

To sum up, the libertarian philosophy is more complicated than simply making deductions from the word "liberty" and then assuming all libertarians have the same beliefs in all areas. As Bastiat said in 1850: "We have tried so many things, when shall we try the simplest of all, freedom?"

PHILIP BALTIMORE

Ventnor

Corps isn't 'selling'

Margate dunes project

A group opposed to the shore-protection project in Margate says the Army Corps of Engineers has been "selling" this project. I have to come to the Army Corps' defense. It doesn't "sell" any project to a municipality. At our Aug. 17 public meeting, the agency provided general background on the project and then went on to take questions.

What does the Army Corps have to gain from selling this? I don't think anything. I also want to remind our residents that this project is 100 percent federally funded, and it will not commit us to future spending on renourishment every three years unless the city desires it.

The corps has studied many alternatives, and if you'd like a copy of its report explaining all the options it has explored and why it recommends what it does, please contact our office at 822-0424, and we will email you a copy.

I support this project because it will protect Margate, its residents and their property. But thank God we live in a democracy and have choices. Learn everything you can, go to the meetings on both sides of the issue and vote in November.

BRENDA TAUBE

City Commissioner

Margate