Don't put Republicans

back in charge in Brig.

Regarding the Aug. 15 article, "Brigantine group seeks government change":

I think it's time for Brigantine to wake up to what's been happening in our town.

This group to change government is the Republicans again. They were in power for so long, and now they don't like having to share power. Mayor Phil Guenther has been in power for more than 20 years and did not have to answer to anyone. Now he does not have control, and he doesn't like it.

The Republican Party has put Brigantine in the mess it is in today. We should stop and think what this group is trying to do. Brigantine has tried the commission form of government before, and it did not work.

I think the Democrats are doing a great job for Brigantine and are trying to stop the spending that the Republicans have done in the past years. City Manager Jennifer Blumenthal is also doing a great job. More people in Brigantine should speak up if they want to save their town.

JOHN HEIL

Brigantine

A.C. Electric quick to fix

burned-out street lights

I want to thank Atlantic City Electric Company. I recently called about two street lights that were burning out, leaving the streets dark for extended periods of time. A phone call got the problem solved.

If you notice a flickering light, call customer service at 800-642-3780 and, at the prompt, say "street light." You'll be transferred to a person. Give the street-light pole number and location. Let's help them help us.

ROSALYN JENNINGS

Pleasantville

South Korea's success

shows war was worth it

During the Korean War, we were in the Yellow Sea when we were ordered to pick up some prisoners near Pusan. They turned out to be a band of South Korean bandits calling themselves freedom fighters.

We were to transport them north to near the Chinese border, return their weapons plus a couple more, and let them off to cause havoc with the bad guys.

There were 16 of them, all very young, and we kept them on our quarterdeck under armed guard. I got friendly with the leader, a very smart 16-year-old. He spoke a little English and Japanese, and we were able to communicate.

He said he hoped the war would last a very long time because he never had it so good. This is what war did for those young men. They were orphans without homes or family. No farm to work, nothing to do to earn a living.

Looking back with hindsight, Korea was worth fighting for, and I believe we won, because today South Korea is a success story.

JOHN VIOLA SR.

Newfield

Criminal investigation

•eeded in P'ville schools

Regarding the Aug. 27 story, "Pleasantville schools audit/State finds district misspending funds":

Really? Again? I was confident that the problems in the Pleasantville schools were corrected with the assignment of a state monitor. I was wrong. It appears the monitor was as useless as a screendoor covering a cesspool, because there was something stinking right under his nose.

Any homeowner knows what the low price is when buying an item. If a superintendent, business administrator or school board member cannot pick the lowest bid, they have lost their right to their jobs.

Pleasantville has had 11 superintendents in the last 10 years, but that is not an excuse. All of them were paid a great salary, and they, along with the school board, should have done their jobs. The vice president of the school board said, "There is definitely a lack of leadership in this district." Here is a news flash for her: You were elected to lead, and if someone was interfering, you should have been yelling like a wild person. You and the board should resign.

The real problem is the state collecting our tax money and throwing it at this district without any accountability. The school board spends without any regard because it is not their money.

Finally, the comments from the mayor of Pleasantville indicate he knows something does not pass the smell test. A criminal investigation needs to be done, and the next thing some of those involved need to smell is a jail cell.

ROBERT HARTMAN

Cold Spring